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First-year English

Which first-year English course is right for you?

Students in most degree programs at UBC Okanagan are required to take between 3 and 6 credits of first-year English.

To meet this requirement, the Department of English and Cultural Studies offers an exciting range of first-year English courses in writing and literature.

These courses provide important critical thinking and communication/research skills you will use throughout your university degree, whether you are planning to major in English or are meeting a requirement for another program.

 

What is my program's requirement?

 Degree program  First-year English/communication requirement
 Bachelor of Applied Science  Must take APSC 176
 Bachelor of Arts  6 credits of first-year ENGL
 Bachelor of Human Kinetics  3 credits of first-year ENGL
 Bachelor of Management  ENGL 112 or ENGL 114; or ENGL 6 credits any level
 Bachelor of Science in Nursing  One (3 credits) of ENGL 112 or 114, 113, 150, 151, 153
 Bachelor of Science  6 credits of first-year ENGL

 

How should I select my English course?

Consider your writing background and interests to help identify the course(s) best suited for you. Choose from the following options:

UBC Admissions has identified you as an English language learner: ENGL 109

ENGL 109: Studies in Composition for English Language Learners (6 credits)

This course is open to those students who have been directed to enrol in English 109 by the Admissions Office. This is a full-year course running from September to April. English 109 is designed for both international and domestic students who need to strengthen their English-language university-level communication skills in order to succeed in post-secondary studies. The course is particularly suited for English as an additional language and for students who would like to strengthen their skills in these areas:

  • Rhetoric
  • Critical analysis
  • Grammar
  • Documentation
  • Research-based writing in English

You are fluent in English and want to study writing and composition at the university level: ENGL 112 and 114

ENGL 112: Studies in Composition (3 credits)​

This course is open to all UBCO students who have not taken ENGL 109 or 114. English 112 is designed for students who are fluent in English (whether native speakers or multilingual) who wish to improve their writing and research skills to ensure success in post-secondary studies. In this course, we take a practice-based approach to writing at the university level, and we emphasize the process involved in research-based writing.

ENGL 114: Studies in Composition: Aboriginal Perspectives (3 credits)

This course is open to students recommended by Aboriginal Programs and Services who have not taken English 109 or 112. We take a practice-based approach to writing at the university level in relation to aboriginal perspectives. English 114 is designed for students who wish to improve their writing and research skills to ensure success in post-secondary studies. To support this goal, we emphasize the processes involved in research-based writing.

You are fluent in English and want to build critical thinking and writing skills while studying literature in a range of cultural contexts: ENGL 150, 151, 153, 154, and 156

ENGL 150: Introduction to Literary Genre (3 credits)

This course is open to all UBCO students. It is highly recommended for students wishing to major in arts and humanities subjects like English or History, but students in other degree programs will find the focus on literature of all kinds—poetry, fiction, drama—to be engaging. Students in English 150 will develop important critical thinking and analytical skills because of our focus on the interpretation of texts. We also devote a substantial portion of class time (at least 35%) to practice-based instruction in essay writing and research.

ENGL 151: Critical Studies in Literature (3 credits)

This course is open to all UBCO students. It is highly recommended for students wishing to major in arts and humanities subjects like English or History, but students in other degree programs will find the focus on critical analysis and critical thinking to be beneficial for study at the university level. We examine the various ways that literary critics and readers of all sorts engage with literature. We test a range of distinct critical approaches (such as feminist, postcolonial, and psychoanalytical ways of reading), and in doing so, develop important intellectual skills. We also devote a substantial portion of class time (at least 35%) to practice-based instruction in essay writing and research.

ENGL 153: Readings in Narrative (3 credits)

This course is open to all UBCO students. It is recommended for students who are intrigued by the study of narrative forms such as life-writing, films, histories, myths, narrative poems, noels, short stories, and songs. Like our other ENGL 15X series of courses, students in English 153 will develop important critical thinking and analytical skills, and will gain experience in research-based writing.

ENGL 154: Indigenous Narrative (3 credits)

This course on Indigenous narrative forms is open to all UBCO students. It is highly recommended for students wishing to major in arts and humanities subjects like English or History, but students in other degree program will find the focus on critical analysis and critical thinking to be beneficial for study at the university level. We will introduce a range of Indigenous writing, including textual and oral forms of storytelling such as those found in anecdotes, autobiography, biography, diaries, life-writing, films, histories, narrative poems, novels, performances, and songs. We also devote a substantial portion of class time (at least 35%) to practice-based instruction in essay writing and research.

ENGL 155: Reading, Writing, and Making with Technology in the Humanities (3 credits)

This course is open to all UBCO students, and is highly recommended for students who are interested in digital and technological cultures. We will focus on a humanities-based approach to digital technology, which will include exploring a range of historical periods in the development of technology, as well as examining critical approaches to digital media. We also devote a substantial portion of class time (at least 35%) to practice-based instruction in university-level humanities criticism, writing, and research, which could include writing about technology and culture, composition across media forms, basic digital research methods, and/or critical prototyping.

ENGL 156: Environmental Literature

This course is open to all UBCO students. It is highly recommended for students who are interested in sustainability and the environment. We study literary texts and critical writings in an area of literary criticism identified as "ecocriticism". We also devote a substantial portion of class time (at least 35%) to practice-based instruction in essay writing and research.

 

Questions

Email advising.ubco@ubc.ca and we'll be happy to help!

Last reviewed shim5/9/2019 4:14:23 PM