What can I do with my major?

Explore first. Learn along the way. Make informed decisions about professional opportunities.

The experiences you have, the people you meet, and what you learn about yourself along the way all contribute to building your career. Choosing a major or preparing to graduate are exciting and overwhelming times. The best strategy is to actively explore what interests you, and reflect on the skills you’re building.

Arts

Anthropology is the integrated study of what it means to be human in the broadest possible sense. Anthropologists are interested in the findings of all fields pertaining to humans from anywhere on the globe, both past and present. Anthropology connects the natural sciences, the social sciences, and the humanities.

Anthropologists tend to specialize in one of four major sub-fields:

  • Anthropology archaeology
  • Biological anthropology
  • Cultural anthropology
  • Linguistic anthropology

If I study anthropology, I could develop abilities to:

  • Analyze issues with cross-cultural understanding
  • Communicate clearly in both oral and written formats
  • Conduct field studies, including interviews, statistical analysis, and evaluation of qualitative data
  • Engage in cross-cultural communication
  • Gather, organize, interpret, and present data
  • Perform research and analytical tasks
  • Recognize with proficiency cultural differences and similarities
  • Understand the origin and physical, social, or cultural development of societies and human behaviour
  • Use social, behavioural, biological, and other scientific research methods
  • Work with people from a variety of cultural backgrounds to address issues and find creative solutions to problems

If I study anthropology, I could develop a career in various occupations such as:

  • Advocate
  • Archaeological technician
  • Assistant language instructor
  • Bilingual/bicultural program specialist
  • Collections manager
  • Communications officer
  • Community development officer
  • Community support worker
  • Cultural consultant to police
  • Cultural resource manager
  • Curator
  • Ethnographic research assistant
  • Exhibit assistant
  • First Nations land claims advisor
  • Foreign service officer
  • Forensics assistant
  • Fundraising consultant
  • Health researcher
  • Heritage interpreter
  • Immigration services consultant
  • Impact assessor
  • International student advisor
  • Manager, cultural business council
  • Map and aerial photo interpreter
  • Market researcher
  • Media developer
  • Multicultural education specialist
  • Museum and gallery assistant
  • Organizational analyst
  • Outreach assistant
  • Park interpreter
  • Policy analyst
  • Policy researcher
  • Project officer, urban Aboriginal strategy
  • Public health educator
  • Research analyst
  • Sales representative
  • Social development advisor
  • Social impact analyst
  • Strategic planning advisor
  • Travel agent/guide/consultant
  • Travel of technical writer
  • Urban planner
  • Youth worker

Organizations and agencies that employ anthropology graduates include:

  • Community education and outreach organizations relating to demographics, multiculturalism, and consultation services provided to business, industry, and governments
  • Environmental, exploration, or engineering companies
  • Federal and provincial government departments or agencies such as administration, criminal justice systems, cultural resources management, legislative compliance, or military
  • Museums, libraries, and archives
  • Non-profit organizations and social agencies focusing on community services, First Nations issues and land claim resolutions, gerontology, human and civil rights, immigration services, international aid or development, public education, or public housing projects
  • Private business focusing on administration, human resources, public relations, sales/marketing, market research, or publishing

Economics is a social science concerned with choice and trade-offs among competing alternatives given scarce resources. It is the study of how people, institutions, and nations manage their scarce resources (such as time, money, and materials), make choices by comparing costs and benefits, and act on these choices and interact with each other; and how the behaviour of people, institutions, and nations reflect the incentives they face and changes in response to different incentives.

If I study economics, I could develop abilities to:

  • Apply statistical methods
  • Collect and organize data using statistical methods
  • Create and evaluate financial reports and statements
  • Demonstrate computer literacy
  • Design projects, organize materials, and project and analyze results
  • Maintain accurate records
  • Manipulate numerical data and analyze results
  • Measure, evaluate, and construct economic arguments
  • Meet deadlines
  • Monitor and forecast economic trends
  • Perform cost/benefit analyses
  • Relate theory to practice
  • Solve problems and make predictions based on economic/market trends
  • Tabulate figures
  • Use oral presentation skills
  • Write clear and detailed technical reports

If I study economics, I could develop a career in various occupations such as:

  • Account manager
  • Actuarial assistant
  • Advertising media planner
  • Benefits administrator
  • Business analyst
  • Claims examiner
  • Collection agent
  • Commodity/property assessor
  • Compensation analyst
  • Construction estimator
  • Credit/loan administrator
  • Economic forecaster
  • Economic development officer
  • Employee benefits officer
  • Energy researcher
  • Financial/budget counsellor
  • Health policy planner
  • Insurance claims adjuster
  • Insurance underwriter trainee
  • Labour economist
  • Labour relations negotiator
  • Land management specialist
  • Lobbyist
  • Legislative aide
  • Market research analyst
  • Media analyst
  • Merchandiser
  • Operations research analyst
  • Policy analyst
  • Public policy advisor
  • Regulatory analyst
  • Research commodity analyst
  • Securities analyst
  • Trust administrator
Additional education or certification may be required for some fields and occupations.

Organizations and agencies that employ economics graduates include:

  • Banking, brokerage, financial planning, and investing firms
  • Business focusing on compensation consulting, enterprise risk management, journalism, manufacturing and trading, energy, and telecommunications
  • Government departments involved in agriculture, economic development, finance, gaming, labour, liquor control, policy analysis, and transportation
  • Life, property, and casualty insurance companies
  • Public sector organizations such as workers compensation boards and health authorities

Links and professional associations:

The general studies Bachelor of Arts is for students who wish to pursue a general liberal studies program. Students enrolled in the general studies Bachelor of Arts must fulfill requirements from the three groupings drawn from four categories:

  • Humanities
  • Social science
  • Science
  • Creative and performing arts

There are many different ways to combine courses of interest to build this degree. A general studies Bachelor of Arts gives students the opportunity to create a unique program based on particular interests and abilities; it also provides a broad foundation with an interdisciplinary framework applicable to a broad range of occupations. This degree is appropriate for students planning to continue study in professional areas, such as law and teaching.

If I study general studies, I could develop abilities to:

  • Apply knowledge to problem-solving tasks
  • Assess and be resourceful while solving complex problems
  • Collect and observe data with precision and accuracy
  • Communicate effectively in both oral and written formats
  • Demonstrate an understanding of and use logical arguments in a productive way
  • Engage in public speaking
  • Meet deadlines
  • Perform comprehensive research
  • Think analytically, critically, and creatively
  • Work in a systematic and organized manner
  • Write clear and accurate reports

If I study general studies, I could develop a career in various occupations such as:

  • Administrative support worker
  • Artist
  • Circulation assistant
  • Civil servant
  • Communications assistant
  • Communications skills trainer
  • Communications specialist
  • Community support worker
  • Cross-cultural advisor
  • Educator/corporate trainer
  • Event planner
  • Film and television agent
  • Human resource officer
  • Journalist
  • Law enforcement administrator
  • Lawyer
  • Liaison and information officer
  • Marketing communications coordinator
  • Market research analyst
  • Marketing associate
  • Mass media analyst
  • Materials processor
  • Personal banking manager
  • Pharmaceutical sales
  • Police officer
  • Privacy program administrator
  • Professional writer
  • Project manager
  • Public relations professional
  • Quality coach/manager
Additional education or certification may be required for some fields and occupations.

Organizations and agencies that employ general studies graduates include:

  • Federal government departments with portfolios such as Aboriginal affairs, international development, industry and development, environment and environmental protection, fisheries and oceans, agriculture, foreign affairs, natural resources, elections, and parks
  • Municipal governments and regional districts focusing on functions such as planning, recreation and parks, corporate services, and transportation
  • Private-sector urban and regional planning, geographic information systems services, and resources and analysis management firms
  • Provincial government agencies such as agriculture and lands, community services, economic development, environment, forests, tourism, housing, assessments, or municipal affairs

Links and professional associations:

Simply put, geography is about the world we live in. It can be defined as the study of earth’s landscapes, places, environments, and peoples. It is unique as an academic discipline because of its ability to bridge the social sciences with the natural sciences and integrate ideas and methods from many different disciplines. Geographers understand the cultural and physical processes within places and regions, thus often contributing to the applied management of environments and resources. Geography courses provide students with valuable and relevant social, natural, and environmental sciences training, whatever their degree program.

If I study geography, I could develop abilities to:

  • Analyze and use standard statistical methods
  • Analyze verbal, written, and other forms of non-numerical data
  • Understand relationships between nature and society
  • Conduct field studies and observe system interactions
  • Conduct spatial analyses of socioeconomic patterns, problems, and forces
  • Gather and analyze statistical, population, and land use data
  • Identify, explain, and find meaning in spatial patterns
  • Interpret the changing relationships between populations and the environment
  • Manipulate geographic data and work with maps, graphs, and diagrams
  • Understand societal developments and the interrelationship of social, economic, political, and cultural factors
  • Understand the earth’s physical environments and interrelationships that exist among them
  • Use computer modeling and GIS technologies

If I study geography, I could develop a career in various occupations such as:

  • Air photo interpreter
  • Cartographer
  • Climatologist
  • Community development specialist
  • Cultural resource specialist
  • Demographer
  • Ecotourism manager
  • Emergency management officer
  • Environmental impact specialist
  • Environmental quality specialist
  • Forestry technician
  • Geomorphologist
  • Hazardous waste planner
  • Heritage planner
  • Housing specialist
  • Hydrologist
  • Land developer/surveyor
  • Land economist
  • Land-use analyst
  • Map curator or editor
  • Parks planner
  • Parks warden
  • Photogrammetric technician
  • Real estate analyst
  • Recreational and tourism planner
  • Remote sending analyst
  • Resource economist or planner
  • Soil assessment technician
  • Transportation planner
  • Urban/regional planner/technician
  • Water use analyst
  • Weather and climate specialist
  • Wildfire manager
  • Waste management specialist
Additional education or certification may be required for some fields and occupations.

Organizations and agencies that employ geography graduates include:

  • Federal government departments with portfolios such as Aboriginal affairs, international development, industry development, environment and environmental protection, fisheries and oceans, agriculture, foreign affairs, natural resources, elections, and parks
  • Municipal governments and regional districts focusing on functions such as planning, recreation and parks, corporate services, and transportation
  • Private-sector urban and regional planning, geographic information systems services, and resources and analysis management firms
  • Provincial government agencies, such as agriculture and lands, community services, economic development, environment, forests, tourism, housing, assessments, and municipal affairs

Links and professional associations:

History draws on the social sciences and humanities for most of its data and conceptual techniques, but remains essentially a study in the dimension of time, with methods of inquiry appropriate to such a study. The study of history provides education about the society in which we live and its past development. Since it involves the examination of people in an almost unlimited variety of situations, the study of history deepens the understanding of people’s capacities and failings. Properly pursued, it trains the mind to generalize on the basis of evidence and to distinguish propaganda from fact. History is an excellent first degree for those intending to go on to more advanced education in a number of fields.

If I study history, I could develop abilities to:

  • Collect, contextualize, organize, synthesize, and analyze data
  • Communicate effectively in oral and written formats
  • Compare and contrast various perspectives and information
  • Conduct detail-oriented research
  • Develop reasoned and research-supported arguments
  • Employ interdisciplinary research methodology
  • Evaluate historical data
  • Keep accurate records and write reports
  • Present ideas, complex information, and data clearly
  • Think and read critically
  • Understand and interpret past and present data
  • Use logical thinking and memorization techniques
  • Work successfully independently and with groups

If I study history, I could develop a career in various occupations such as:

  • Antique dealer
  • Archivist assistant
  • Assistant to MP/MLA
  • Biography
  • Community relations director
  • Conservator consultant
  • Consumer advocate
  • Culture and heritage editor
  • Document retriever/researcher
  • Editor
  • Foreign service officer
  • Heritage assistant
  • Historic interpreter
  • Historic site administrator
  • Immigration officer
  • International development worker
  • Journalist
  • Legislative analyst or aide
  • Media production
  • Movie/TV historical consultant
  • Museum educator or assistant
  • Park interpreter
  • Parliamentary clerk
  • Policy analyst
  • Public administrator/manager
  • Publisher’s assistant
  • Tourism guide
  • Writer
Additional education or certification may be required for some fields and occupations.

Organizations and agencies that employ history graduates include:

  • Government departments and agencies focused on community development, national defense, and parks and recreation
  • Industry, including law firms, oil/gas/mining exploration, and travel companies
  • Media outlets (print, radio, and television)
  • Museums, heritage sites, and other organizations focused on archiving/history, preservation, and heritage policy
  • Political parties
  • Production and publishing companies

Links and professional associations:

This interdisciplinary program offers courses that provide perspectives of Indigenous peoples from the Okanagan, Canada, and the world communities. The involvement of the Okanagan Nation and the En’owkin Centre in its development and in ongoing partnership provide a strong foundation in the Okanagan community and ensure continuing input from Indigenous perspectives.

Courses are offered at the second-year level in Okanagan and Amerindian Indigenous history and cultures. In the third and fourth years, courses in Indigenous governance, the justice system, land claims, traditional ecological knowledge, the protection of heritage, Indigenous theory, methodology, and research applications are offered. Students may complete their major or minor program by taking approved courses on Indigenous topics in other disciplines and faculties.

If I study indigenous studies, I could develop abilities to:

  • Analyze concepts, definitions, arguments, and problems
  • Apply decolonizing methodologies to research
  • Apply strong critical thinking, organizational, creative, and transformative leadership abilities to my work
  • Communicate effectively in oral and written formats
  • Conduct comparative analysis and synthesis and determine holistic, relational patterns
  • Conduct interdisciplinary research
  • Develop cross-cultural experience and knowledge
  • Evaluate and implement research methods incorporating written documents and oral traditions
  • Identify how language, culture, identity, social structures, colonialism and resistance, and political issues have shaped First Nations issues in Canada
  • Problem solve and meet deadlines

If I study indigenous studies, I could develop a career in various occupations such as:

  • Aboriginal outreach worker
  • Aboriginal stakeholder liaison
  • Community affairs specialist
  • Community development consultant
  • Conflict resolution specialist
  • Culture and heritage editor
  • Economic development advisor
  • Events/conference planner
  • Fundraiser/development officer
  • Government relations advisor
  • Heritage interpreter
  • Human rights and justice officer
  • Immigration officer
  • Journalist
  • Lobbyist
  • Mediator/negotiator
  • Museum assistant
  • Policy analyst
  • Political aide or researcher
  • Public administrator
  • Public policy analyst
  • Public relations consultant
  • Social analyst
  • Tourism services worker
  • United Nations reporter

Organizations and agencies that employ indigenous studies graduates include:

  • Government ministries and agencies, including provincial, federal, and band offices
  • Industry, including consulting firms, environmental and assessment agencies, marketing groups, oil and gas exploration companies, research centres, and telecommunications firms
  • Non-profit and community organizations focused on Aboriginal, cultural, historical, museum, public education, and social services

Links and professional associations:

In an increasingly global society, the relevance of international boundaries is becoming more important yet paradoxically less apparent in our day-to-day lives. The interdisciplinary degree involves the study of nations and how they interact, from the historical origins to the notion of nationalism.

The International Relations major is a program offered through UBC Okanagan’s interdisciplinary degree option, and allows students to develop a solid background in related areas of political science, history, sociology-anthropology, economics, and modern languages. The International Relations program stresses critical thinking and essential communication skills. International Relations majors at UBC Okangaan are encouraged to study and travel in other countries as part of their Bachelor of Arts major requirements.

If I study international relations, I could develop abilities to:

  • Articulate the role of international governing and regulating bodies in determining policies
  • Deal with large volumes of information and identify key tasks and priorities
  • Describe Canadian culture and values
  • Examine and evaluate established policies
  • Investigate, analyze, and advocate solutions to complex political problems
  • Research and critically analyze material from a range of sources
  • Research background information needed to develop foreign policy
  • Synthesize relevant information to construct a coherent argument
  • Understand the nature and significance of politics as global activity

If I study international relations, I could develop a career in various occupations such as:

  • Business development manager
  • Commercial specialist
  • Communications advisor
  • Customs inspector
  • Development/fundraising officer
  • Economic policy analyst
  • Foreign affairs analyst
  • Foreign exchange trader
  • Foreign service officer
  • Human rights officer
  • Import/export coordinator
  • International bank trainee
  • International development project coordinator
  • International policy analyst
  • International relations officer
  • Interpreter/translator
  • Investment advisor
  • Journalist
  • Labour relations manager
  • Market research assistant
  • Marketing agent
  • Media relations manager
  • Political researcher or aide
  • Program analyst
  • Project facilitator
  • Public affairs researcher
  • Public policy analyst
  • Public servant
  • Reporter/correspondent
  • Special events coordinator
  • Tour guide

Organizations and agencies that employ international relations graduates include:

  • Banking, human resources, marketing, retail, and shipping industries
  • Broadcasting, foreign news, journalism, magazines, and wire service agencies
  • International, government, or non-government organizations focusing on humanitarian services, policy development, disaster relief, program administration, public health, and research

Links and professional associations:

Mathematics is a powerful tool for solving practical problems, combining logic and precision with intuition and imagination. The basic goal of mathematics is to reveal and explain patterns – whether it appears as electrical impulses in an animal’s nervous system, as fluctuations in stock market prices, or as fine details of an abstract geometric figure.

If I study mathematics, I could develop abilities to:

  • Analyze, interpret, and summarize data using computer software
  • Apply mathematical principles to the collection, analysis, and presentation of numerical data
  • Apply quantitative knowledge and reasoning to theoretical and applied sciences (e.g. population biology, computer graphics, internet security)
  • Apply statistical methods to survey development and analysis
  • Build mathematical models of real-world systems to formulate and solve practical problems
  • Design surveys and experiments
  • Establish and control hypothetical designs
  • Forecast sales, analyze business conditions, and help solve management problems
  • Gather, compile, analyze, and interpret economic and statistical data
  • Make and break codes
  • Measure distances, sizes, and relationships; perform complex calculations; and analyze probabilities
  • See relationships among factors and find computational errors
  • Think logically and analytically
  • Utilize statistical software

If I study mathematics, I could develop a career in various occupations such as:

  • Actuarial associate
  • Actuary
  • Bank loan or trust officer
  • Benefits administrator
  • Biostatistician
  • Cartographer
  • Commercial quantitative analyst
  • Commodity manager
  • Compensation/benefits officer
  • Consumer credit/loan officer
  • Credit analyst
  • Database administrator
  • Economist
  • External auditor
  • Financial analyst
  • Financial planner
  • General or management accounting
  • Health care analyst
  • Insurance salesperson
  • International trade specialist
  • Inventory control specialist
  • Market research analyst
  • Mathematical technician
  • Numerical analyst
  • Operations research analyst
  • Pollster
  • Public health statistician
  • Purchasing agent
  • Quantitative analyst
  • Regulatory analyst
  • Research associate
  • Revenue Canada investigator
  • Risk assessor
  • Sports statistician
  • Systems analyst
  • Technical writer/communicator
  • Transportation planner
  • Treasury management specialist
  • Wage analyst
Additional education or certification may be required for some fields and occupations.

Organizations and agencies that employ mathematics graduates include:

  • Businesses providing actuarial, banking, consulting, investment, market research, and security services
  • Computer, pharmaceutical, resource, software design, and utility companies
  • Finance organizations, and mutual and pension funds firms
  • Insurance agencies, including life, health, property/casualty, and reinsurance companies
  • Manufacturers and other companies requiring process improvement
  • Medical and educational research agencies
  • Provincial, territorial, band, and other levels of government offices
  • Science and engineering consulting firms
  • Statistics Canada and other federal government departments

Links and professional associations:

The major in philosophy provides students with an understanding of the general intellectual landscape by studying the ideas of the eminent thinkers of the past and present. Studying philosophy will, among other things, allow students to examine and express ideas and arguments clearly, precisely, and logically. Philosophy is good preparation for careers in law, journalism, business, the civil services, and all forms of scholarly activity.

If I study philosophy, I could develop abilities to:

  • Analyze concepts, definitions, arguments, and problems
  • Communicate with clarity and precision, both orally and in writing
  • Distinguish fine differences between views and discover common ground between opposing positions
  • Listen abstractly, actively, and objectively
  • Observe and evaluate in a critical manner
  • Organize ideas and issues, deal with questions of value, and extract what is essential from masses of information
  • Present ideas through well-constructed, systematic arguments
  • Synthesize a variety of views or perspectives into a unified whole
  • Understand ethical and practical problems

If I study philosophy, I could develop a career in various occupations such as:

  • Advocate/lawyer
  • Aide worker
  • Arbitrator
  • Bioethical consultant
  • Broadcast writer
  • Columnist
  • Consumer advocate
  • Contract administrator
  • CSIS/RCMP officer
  • Critic
  • Editorial assistant
  • Entrepreneur
  • Ethics consultant
  • Freelance writer
  • Fundraiser/grant writer
  • Health administrator
  • Human resource manager
  • Image consultant
  • Insurance agent
  • Inventory control specialist
  • Investigative journalist
  • Journalist
  • Legislative aide
  • Lobbyist
  • Logistic specialist
  • Management consultant
  • Market research analyst
  • Negotiator
  • Public policy analyst
  • Public relations specialist
  • Publisher
  • Technical writer
Additional education or certification may be required for some fields and occupations.

Organizations and agencies that employ philosophy graduates include:

  • Journalism and media outlets such as publishing companies, magazines, newspapers, technical writing, and public relations firms
  • Local, provincial, and federal government departments such as archives and heritage, communications, Foreign Service, and public policy
  • Non-profit organizations, including social and community services, public interest research groups, and public education facilities
  • Organizations addressing ethics and information management, including environmental firms, health services organizations, information technology companies, legal firms, medical schools, and research facilities

Links and professional associations:

The political science major provides a solid understanding of the institutions of government, their relationship to politically active non-governmental organizations, the articulation and implementation of public policy, and the role of the informed global citizen in a liberal-democratic system.

If I study political science, I could develop abilities to:

  • Analyze and interpret the results of statistical and comparative studies
  • Analyze social, cultural, and political issues, including the nature of power, the causes of conflict, and the quality of governance
  • Analyze the public policy-making process
  • Apply knowledge of and to current events
  • Appreciate and evaluate competing perspectives and engage in debate
  • Communicate effectively in oral and written contexts
  • Conceptualize and implement projects
  • Develop a persuasive argument backed by facts and evidence
  • Influence and persuade diverse groups
  • Present ideas and data clearly
  • Synthesize themes from complex information
  • Understand political philosophy and theories of political systems

If I study political science, I could develop a career in various occupations such as:

  • Assistant to MP/MLA
  • Campaign worker
  • Communication officer
  • Community relations director
  • Consumer advocate
  • Economic development officer
  • Editor
  • Environmental policy analyst
  • Event coordinator
  • Foreign correspondent
  • Foreign service worker
  • Government affairs specialist
  • Heritage site interpreter
  • Immigration or customs officer
  • International organization official
  • Labour analyst
  • Labour relations negotiator
  • Legislative correspondent
  • Lobbyist
  • Management analyst
  • Media analyst
  • Military officer
  • Journalist
  • Policy consultant or researcher
  • Probation/parole officer
  • Public administrator/manager
  • Public policy analyst
  • Public relations professional
  • Radio/TV announcer
  • Speech-writer
  • Technical writer
Additional education or certification may be required for some fields and occupations.

Organizations and agencies that employ political science graduates include:

  • Local, provincial, and federal government departments or agencies focusing on campaign management, law enforcement, program administration, public policy, research, or regional planning
  • Media outlets, including broadcasting, internet, magazine, newspaper, radio, or wire services
  • Non-governmental organizations serving as think-tanks for political parties or government organizations, or engaged in political activities both in Canada and worldwide
  • Non-profit organizations including fundraising, public interest/advocacy, and public relations organizations
  • Private industry: financial companies, insurance firms, manufacturers, public policy research and analysis firms, political consulting agencies, public relations firms, and survey research services
  • Trade union organizations

Links and professional associations:

An interdisciplinary degree program at UBC Okanagan. The philosophy, politics and economics (PPE) major encompasses philosophy, which teaches logic, ethics, and how to question critically; politics, which forms the structure and institutions that form policies and determine the rules by which we are governed; and economics, which encompasses how we make decisions as individuals and groups in our increasingly global world market.

If I study philosophy, politics, and economics (PPE), i could develop abilities to:

  • Analyze concepts, definitions, arguments, and problems
  • Apply statistical methods
  • Collect and organize data using statistical methods
  • Communicate effectively in both oral and written contexts
  • Create and evaluate financial reports/statements
  • Design projects, organize materials, and project and analyze results
  • Listen abstractly, actively, and objectively
  • Maintain accurate records
  • Manipulate numerical data and analyze results
  • Measure, evaluate, and construct economic arguments
  • Observe and evaluate in a critical manner
  • Perform cost/benefit analyses
  • Present ideas through well-constructed, systematic arguments
  • Relate theory to practice
  • Solve problems and make predictions based on economic/market trends
  • Synthesize a variety of views or perspectives into a unified whole
  • Tabulate figures
  • Understand public policy

If I study philosophy, political science, and economics (PPE), I could develop a career in various occupations such as:

  • Account manager
  • Actuarial assistant
  • Advertising media planner
  • Assistant to MP/MLA
  • Benefits administrator
  • Broadcast writer
  • Business analyst
  • Campaign worker
  • Claims examiner
  • Collection agent
  • Communication officer
  • Community relations director
  • Community resource coordinator
  • Consumer advocate
  • Crime victim services worker
  • Economic development officer
  • Employee benefits officer
  • Employment counsellor
  • Energy researcher
  • Entrepreneur
  • Foreign correspondent
  • Foreign service officer
  • Freelance writer
  • Human rights worker
  • Immigration or customs officer
  • Journalist
  • Labour analyst
  • Labour relations specialist
  • Market research analyst
  • Media analyst
  • Operations research analyst
  • Public relations officer
  • Radio/TV announcer
  • Speech-writer

Organizations and agencies that employ philosophy, politics, and economics (PPE) graduates include:

  • Businesses such as banks, brokerage firms, compensation consulting firms, energy companies, enterprise risk management companies, manufacturing and trading firms, and telecommunications agencies
  • Industry and services addressing ethics and information management, finance, insurance, public policy research and analysis, political consulting, and public relations
  • Local, provincial, and federal government departments and agencies focusing on archives and heritage, campaign management, communications, economic development, finance, foreign service, labour, law enforcement, program administration, public policy, regional planning, or transportation
  • Journalism and media outlets with a focus on publishing, magazines, newspapers, technical writing, and public relations
  • Non-profit organizations, including community and social services, public interest/advocacy groups, and public education facilities

Links and professional associations:

Psychology is the study of human and animal behaviour. It also has practical applications such as the determination of the best conditions for learning and memory, the design of work environments for greatest productivity, and the development of therapies for the treatment of behavioural disorders.

The major in psychology provides a strong foundation for advanced training that can lead to a career as a psychologist or other professional. Most careers in psychology, whether research, clinical, applied, or academic psychology, require a graduate degree.

*Honours options are available in this subject area.

If I study psychology, I could develop abilities to:

  • Assist in conducting research in the physical, cognitive, emotional, or social aspects of human behaviour
  • Communicate effectively in oral and written environments
  • Exhibit empathy towards others
  • Foster group dynamics at a beginning level
  • Gather information through controlled laboratory experiments and the administration of personality, performance, aptitude, and intelligence tests under appropriate supervision
  • Gather information through observation, interviews, questionnaires, clinical studies, and surveys under appropriate supervision
  • Interpret and explain scientific research
  • Organize people, equipment, and ideas
  • Perceive, understand, and explain individual differences
  • Resolve and mediate conflicts at a beginner level
  • Understand ethical practice guidelines
  • Understand human and group behaviour/development
  • Use interpersonal and listening skills effectively

If I study psychology, I could develop a career in various occupations such as:

  • Account manager
  • Actuarial assistant
  • Advertising media planner
  • Assistant to MP/MLA
  • Benefits administrator
  • Broadcast writer
  • Business analyst
  • Campaign worker
  • Claims examiner
  • Collection agent
  • Communication officer
  • Community relations director
  • Community resource coordinator
  • Consumer advocate
  • Crime victim services worker
  • Economic development officer
  • Employee benefits officer
  • Employment counsellor
  • Energy researcher
  • Entrepreneur
  • Foreign correspondent
  • Foreign service officer
  • Freelance writer
  • Human rights worker
  • Immigration or customs officer
  • Journalist
  • Labour analyst
  • Labour relations specialist
  • Market research analyst
  • Media analyst
  • Operations research analyst
  • Public relations officer
  • Radio/TV announcer
  • Speech-writer

Organizations and agencies that employ psychology graduates include:

  • Community and social services with a focus on additions, community, corrections, counselling, disability services, employment, family, healing, youth, and wellness
  • First Nations band offices offering community, education, health, and support services
  • Governmental departments and organizations
  • Non-profit organizations relating to advocacy, fundraising, public relations, and project development
  • Private industry, including advertising, human resources, marketing, public relations, and research organizations
  • Regional health authorities, such as health care, rehabilitation, and treatment clinics or hospitals

Links and professional associations:

Sociology analyses human behaviour as it is shaped by society; this, in turn, affects the social context within which we live. Examples of such contexts are informal groups, families, classrooms, work organizations, cultures, and societies as a whole. Sociologists use a variety of research methods, including historical analyses, participant observation, surveys, fieldwork, and laboratory experiments.

A sociology degree is valuable preparation for a wide variety of careers and occupations. Many exemplary lives have sociology in their backgrounds: Martin Luther King Jr. and Jessie Jackson; Anne Cools, the first Canadian Black senator; Margaret Anne Mitchell, social activist and Member of Parliament; Daniel G. Hill, the first head of the Ontario Human Rights Commission; and Cassie Campbell, the first female hockey player to be included into Canada’s Sports Hall of Fame.

If I study sociology, I could develop abilities to:

  • Adeptly observe and interpret social, cultural, and political issues
  • Be critically aware of and analyze problems in society
  • Creatively solve problems and articulate alternative solutions for contemporary social issues
  • Develop a keen sense of the history of issues across the globe
  • Gather and analyze qualitative and quantitative data on social issues
  • Interpret and articulate information and research effectively through written reports and oral presentations
  • Manage projects and time
  • Oversee and conduct surveys and employ ethical interviewing techniques
  • Understand individual and societal behaviour, forms of communication, and interactions
  • Understand the roles of government, social, and cultural groups and institutions

If I study sociology, I could develop a career in various occupations such as:

  • Archivist/records manager
  • Caseworker
  • Child welfare worker
  • Community relations director
  • Community service worker
  • Consumer advocate
  • Crime victim services worker
  • Criminologist
  • Diversity strategist
  • Elder care support worker
  • Employment counsellor
  • Foreign service officer
  • Fundraiser/development officer
  • Human resources administrator
  • Human rights advocate
  • Immigration officer
  • Journalist
  • Labour analyst
  • Labour relations specialist
  • Legislative aide
  • Librarian
  • Lobbyist
  • Manuscripts curator
  • Market research analyst
  • Mediator
  • Opinion pollster
  • Parole/probation officer
  • Policy analyst
  • Public relations officer
  • Social justice advocate
  • Social policy researcher
  • Urban planner
  • Youth program worker

Organizations and agencies that employ sociology graduates include:

  • Government departments and agencies focusing on administration, criminal justice, international development, research and statistical analysis, and policy analysis and development
  • Non-government organizations, including advocacy offices, community service organizations, environmental groups, international services, and public interest centres
  • Private industries, such as market research, evaluation, proposal writing, strategic planning, and teaching English as a second language (ESL) firms

Links and professional associations:

In a rapidly changing world, it is becoming ever more crucial to think about how justice and equality are related to gender, race, class, sexuality, and nation. Drawing on diverse sources from across the academic spectrum and around the world, gender and women’s studies challenges stereotypes, provokes us to think deeply about our connections with others, and encourages an atmosphere of informed, respectful, and critical discussion.

If I study gender and women’s studies, I could develop abilities to:

  • Acquire a comprehensive understanding of gender and power relations
  • Acquire interdisciplinary academic knowledge with a strong foundation in feminist theory for effective critical analysis
  • Analyze and debate work by feminists in various institutions
  • Communicate clearly in both oral and written formats
  • Develop research experience in qualitative and feminist methodologies
  • Examine the diverse portrayal of gender and women in literature, art, and media and the roles given to them there
  • Examine ways in which women are gendered in diverse societies and discuss their lives, roles, and contributions
  • Gain familiarity with basic concepts, terminology, controversies, and theories in women’s studies
  • Understand mass media, symbolism, and historical and diverse representations of women and gender

If I study gender & women’s studies, I could develop a career in various occupations such as:

  • Advocate
  • Arts administrator
  • Campaign organizer
  • Civil servant
  • Communications officer
  • Community services worker
  • Constituency assistant
  • Consumer researcher
  • Editor
  • Equity policy analyst
  • Event coordinator
  • Film-maker
  • First Nations and project coordinator
  • Fundraiser/development officer
  • Gender development specialist
  • Gender & women’s health researcher
  • Gender & women’s services coordinator
  • Government relations advisor
  • Grant writer
  • Hotline operator
  • Housing or poverty analyst
  • Human resources professional
  • Impact assessment officer
  • Intelligence officer
  • International development staff
  • Investigative journalist
  • Job coach/retention worker
  • LGBTQ centre worker
  • Law enforcement
  • Legislative assistant
  • Lobbyist/organizer
  • Multiculturalism educator
  • Policy analyst
  • Project manager
  • Public administrator
  • Public outreach coordinator
  • Public relations advisor
  • Publishing assistant
  • Reproductive health support worker
  • Settlement worker
  • Strategic planner

Organizations and agencies that employ gender & women’s studies graduates include:

  • Government departments and agencies concerning Canadian human rights, health care, historical sites, human service organizations, and museums
  • Media and publishing houses, including print, radio, TV, and alternative media sources
  • Non-governmental organizations and services, including cultural services, immigrant and refugee services, international development agencies, public education, and women’s organizations
  • Private industry, including communication companies, financial institutions, market research firms, and private foundations

Links and professional associations:

Creative & Critical Studies

The art history program focuses on developing critical thinking and writing abilities for the exploration and analysis of diverse forms of art and visual culture. Art history examines “high” art, popular culture, architecture, everyday objects, performance, and aesthetics in their cultural and historical contexts using interdisciplinary approaches drawing from art history, literary and cultural studies, history, and anthropology.

Art history offers students a unique opportunity to learn about the world’s diverse traditions from faculty with expertise in Canada, Europe, Africa, the Islamic World, South Asia, Indigenous America, and the contemporary global art scene.

Students can obtain either a major or a minor in art history and are also able to combine the program with the study of literatures of different cultures and languages. The program is a practical option for students who are continuing on to professional programs or graduate studies.

If I study art history, i could develop abilities to:

  • Analyze and interpret form, technique, iconography, and the historical function of art
  • Articulate abstract ideas and visual impressions
  • Assess and solve complex problems
  • Collect, observe, and interpret data with precision and accuracy
  • Communicate effectively in oral and written contexts
  • Communicate visual and historical observations within cultural, political, and social contexts
  • Develop reasoned and supported arguments
  • Meet deadlines
  • Perform comprehensive research
  • Perform sophisticated visual and spatial relations analysis
  • Relate visual observations to wider political, social, and cultural contexts
  • Think analytically and critically

If I study art history, I could build a career in various occupations such as:

  • Abstract writer
  • Advertising consultant
  • Advertising designer
  • Arts administrator
  • Art buyer/consultant
  • Art critic
  • Art law consultant
  • Bibliographer
  • Bookstore manager
  • Claim adjuster/examiner
  • Curator
  • Editorial assistant
  • Estate appraiser
  • Exhibit installation specialist
  • Festival assistant
  • Freelance researcher
  • Fundraiser/grant writer
  • Gallery assistant
  • Historical museum assistant
  • Manuscript reader
  • Market research analyst
  • Media planner
  • Museum technician
  • Newspaper/magazine journalist
  • Policy and procedures analyst
  • Proofreader
  • Public affairs coordinator
  • Radio/TV program assistant
  • Reproductions designer
  • Restoration specialist
  • University professor
  • Visual and design assistant

Organizations and agencies that employ gender & women’s studies graduates include:

  • Community theatre companies
  • Museums, galleries, historical societies, insurance firms or brokers, magazines, and publishing houses
  • Provincial and federal arts, cultural, or heritage departments and agencies
  • Television and media production companies

Links and professional associations:

Following the Faculty of Creative and Critical Studies’ focus on the production and reception of art, the creative writing program will provide students with the opportunity to study literature and literary criticism, helping them to bring lessons learned from that study to their own writing. Creative writing is offered as a program concentration.

If I study creative writing, I could develop abilities to:

  • Communicate effectively in writing
  • Create original stories, poems, novels, plays, and screenplays
  • Gather and compile information important for storyline creation
  • Give and take constructive criticism
  • Think analytically and critically
  • Understand the processes involved in taking writing projects from conception to production
  • Use English language, grammar, and spelling with proficiency
  • Use language accurately, effectively, and creatively
  • Work independently and meet deadlines
  • Write clearly and succinctly
  • Write, edit, and proofread texts
  • Write in a variety of styles

If I study creative writing, I could build a career in various occupations such as:

  • Abstract writer
  • Advertising copywriter
  • Arts administrator
  • Author/writer
  • Bibliographer
  • Bookstore manager
  • Communications/public relations professional
  • Copy editor
  • Editor
  • Fundraiser/grant writer
  • Historical museum assistant
  • Literary agent
  • Manuscript reader
  • Market research analyst
  • Media planner
  • Newspaper/magazine journalist
  • Office manager
  • Poet
  • Policy and procedures analyst
  • Proofreader
  • Publisher
  • Radio/TV program assistant
  • Reporter
  • Reviewer for newspapers and magazines
  • Screen/television scriptwriter
  • Songwriter
  • Speech-writer
  • Technical writer
  • Web writer
  • Writing centre director

Organizations and agencies that employ creative writing graduates include:

  • Advertising agencies
  • Book publishers
  • Corporations and consulting firms
  • Federal, provincial, and municipal governments
  • Industry, political, professional, social, and trade organizations
  • Publishers of national, regional, or specialty magazines
  • Radio and television stations

Links and professional associations:

In cultural studies, we think about identity and social roles and challenge the dominant or “normal” assumptions about who and how we are in relation to others. As well, cultural studies explores power and identity; analyzes many different forms of cultural expression, such as television, film, advertising, literature, art, and video games; and studies social and cultural practices, like shopping, cell phone use, and social justice movements. Cultural studies is interdisciplinary: the program draws on courses from a variety of fields. Courses are organized in three streams:

  • Media studies and popular culture
  • Global cultural studies
  • Critical and cultural theory

If I study cultural studies, I could develop abilities to:

  • Analyze arguments, concepts, and research
  • Collect, analyze, and synthesize information
  • Conduct and examine research from an interdisciplinary approach
  • Critically analyze media and cultural practices
  • Develop a variety of communication skills, including writing, speaking, and digital media
  • Develop knowledge through inquiry-based research
  • Examine how social identities are produced
  • Identify and understand the histories, perspectives, and biases that shape representations (news, media, arts, and literature)
  • Self-reflect upon one’s own identity, assumptions, and values
  • Theorize social practices and put theories into practice

If I study cultural studies, I could build a career in various occupations such as:

  • Activist/social justice advocate
  • Anti-oppression educator
  • Art gallery administrator
  • Communications professional
  • Community developer
  • Community researcher
  • Cultural services liaison
  • Educator
  • Event coordinator
  • Foreign services officer
  • Fundraiser/grant writer
  • Heritage research/interpreter
  • Human rights officer
  • Immigration officer
  • Intercultural researcher or educator
  • International aid
  • International relations researcher or advisor
  • Journalist
  • Lawyer or legal analyst
  • Librarian
  • Marketing/advertising professional
  • Media professional or analyst
  • Not-for-profit agency administrator/researcher
  • Public affairs coordinator
  • Public opinion analyst
  • Public policy analyst
  • Publishing industry occupations
  • Radio/TV announcer
  • Theatre administrator
  • Web designer

Organizations and agencies that employ cultural studies graduates include:

  • Cultural institutions
  • Government agencies and departments
  • Media organizations
  • Non-government organizations (NGOs)
  • Not-for-profit agencies
  • Organizations that address cultural safety, diversity, and oppression

Links and professional associations:

As an English student, you are engaged in the close study and analysis of complex texts. You gain a solid background in literature (including novels, short fiction, creative non-fiction, drama, and poetry) from various time periods and geographical locations. You also discover the ways in which the study of literary texts leads to a better understanding of our world. Language, you will learn, is one of the most powerful, political, and philosophical tools that we have in the information age. Mastery of the English language does not simply allow you to use a properly placed semicolon: it empowers you to think critically about the world around you and your place in it.

If I study english, I could develop abilities to:

  • Analyze and use standard statistical methods
  • Communicate effectively, both orally and in writing
  • Conduct research
  • Edit copy for content, style, and punctuation
  • Index and proofread texts
  • Meet deadlines
  • Plan content of documents by organizing material in advance
  • Prepare documents to establish the general layout of articles and advertising text
  • Proofread galleys (proof made from type before it is arranged in a page format)
  • Update or revise written texts to suit different audiences
  • Write articles and editorials

If I study english, I could build a career in various occupations such as:

  • Author
  • Bank officer
  • Book critic
  • Columnist
  • Copywriter/copy editor
  • Corporate communications specialist
  • Court reporter
  • Desktop publisher
  • Documentation specialist
  • Editor
  • Foreign correspondent
  • Information officer
  • Journalist
  • Legislative aide
  • Librarian
  • Linguist
  • Literary agent
  • Manuscript reader/assessor
  • Multimedia writer
  • Newspaper/magazine editor
  • Overseas language teacher
  • Proofreader
  • Public/media relations officer
  • Publisher
  • Radio/TV newscaster
  • Radio/TV producer
  • Reporter
  • Scriptwriter
  • Speech coach
  • Speech researcher
  • Speech-writer
  • Technical writer
  • Writing centre director

Additional education or certification may be required for some fields and occupations.

Organizations and agencies that employ english graduates include:

  • Advertising agencies, internet design firms, multimedia content providers, private consulting firms, research centres, software development companies, and training programs
  • Governments (municipal, provincial, and federal)
  • Large corporations with in-house corporate communications and human resource departments
  • Newspapers, alternative newspapers, books and magazine publishers, and scholarly journals
  • Radio and television stations

Links and professional associations:

French

Whether you are coming from a French immersion program or are new to the language, the study of French can be an excellent focus of your degree or a perfect complement to any program. Study in French can be applied to nearly any field and can facilitate work in nearly every region of the globe.

Spanish

Study in Spanish offers students a comprehensive learning experience that includes one of the world’s most widely spoken languages. In addition to language skills, students will gain knowledge of the literary traditions and a basic historical understanding of the shaping of the cultures of Spain and Spanish America.

If I study modern languages, I could develop abilities to:

  • Articulate and apply grammatical and syntactic rules
  • Communicate effectively in oral and written environments
  • Develop an awareness of and appreciation for cultural differences
  • Exhibit patience and good judgement
  • Interpret and translate texts
  • Read, write, listen, and speak in studied language
  • Research information in new areas
  • Revise and edit documents
  • Understand the customs and traditions of French- or Spanish-speaking countries
  • Understand the structure of modern language
  • Work with a wide variety of people

If I study modern language, I could build a career in various occupations such as:

  • Airline agent
  • Announcer/news broadcaster
  • Bilingual educator
  • Bilingual placement officer
  • Border services officer
  • Citizenship and immigration officer
  • Community worker
  • Copywriter/copyeditor
  • Development agency worker
  • ESL instructor
  • Events/conference organizer
  • Film and TV dubbing specialist
  • Flight attendant
  • Foreign correspondent
  • Foreign exchange trader
  • Foreign service officer
  • Hospitality manager
  • Import/export specialist
  • International airline agent
  • International banking officer
  • International consultant
  • Language assessor
  • Language grants administrator
  • Linguist
  • Multilingual port receptionist
  • Museum assistant
  • Negotiator
  • Overseas personal manager
  • Peacekeeping officer
  • Public policy analyst
  • Public relations officer
  • Radio/television announcer
  • Refugee support worker
  • Reporter
  • Tour operator/guide
  • Translator/interpreter
  • Travel agent/tour designer
  • Travel writer

Organizations and agencies that employ modern languages graduates include:

  • Banks and financial institutions offering customer services and marketing, sales, and operations management positions
  • Interpretation and translation industries, such as educational services, manufacturers, healthcare, court services, and publishers
  • Media and foreign news services, including online sources, radio, magazines, and TV
  • Public administration, government departments, and public agencies, such as BC Public Services, Foreign Affairs, and Canada Border Services Agency

Links and professional associations:

The visual arts program offers a balance of academic study and studio work, immersing students in a critical and contemporary art education. Students will acquire the foundation skills, techniques, and theories to work in two and three dimensions in a variety of media, such as drawing, painting, sculpture, printmaking, photography, computer applications, and video. Students work closely with professors and are given ample studio space and time.

If I study visual arts, I could develop abilities to:

  • Arrange and mount art elements
  • Artistically create original artwork using a variety of media
  • Attend to detail
  • Combine drawing or sculpting skills with other disciplines, including biology, anatomy, and geography
  • Conceptualize and present designs for visual communication
  • Create animation or special effects using computer technology
  • Create digital or print materials for use in newspapers, periodicals, or electronic media
  • Cut and prepare stencils for printmaking
  • Employ manual dexterity into the creation of art
  • Follow layout restrictions and adapt to allocated spaces for illustrations or printed resources
  • Layout and prepare elements for signage and camera-ready printing
  • Perform sophisticated observational, visual, spatial relations, and presentation tasks
  • Use form, interpretation, and various media to create symbolic representations

If I study visual arts, I could build a career in various occupations such as:

  • Advertising copywriter
  • Acquisitions specialist
  • Animator
  • Art agent/dealer
  • Art instructor
  • Billboard artist
  • Book designer
  • Cartoonist
  • CD/record designer
  • Costume designer
  • Curatorial assistant
  • Desktop publishing artist
  • Exhibit designer
  • Freelance artist
  • Graphic designer
  • Greeting card artist
  • Historical museum assistant
  • Illustrator
  • Magazine designer
  • Market research analyst
  • Media planner
  • Newspaper/magazine journalist
  • Painter
  • Pattern maker
  • Photographer
  • Picture framer
  • Printmaker
  • Production artist
  • Product package designer
  • Proofreader
  • Radio/TV programs assistant
  • Reporter
  • Researcher
  • Sculptor
  • Set designer
  • Tattoo artist
  • Technical illustrator
  • Textile designer
  • Visual merchandiser
  • Web designer

Organizations and agencies that employ visual arts graduates include:

  • Advertising, graphic design, printing, and publishing agencies
  • Art-related publishers
  • Community, private, or shared art studios
  • Government or private art galleries or museums
  • Photographic studios, newspapers, or magazines

Links and professional associations:

Education

The mission of the faculty of education at UBC’s Okanagan campus is to educate teachers who will exemplify those attitudes, abilities, and qualities of mind that are requisite for successful teaching. The Faculty’s established goal in achieving this mission is to offer a teacher education program of the highest quality. The Faculty of Education offers undergraduate programs in elementary and secondary teacher education, graduate programs (Masters programs in Teaching & Learning and Educational Leadership & Administration), and post-baccalaureate programs (Early Learning, Inclusive Education, and Language & Literacy).

If I study education, I could develop abilities to:

  • Teach/train different learning levels
  • Work collaboratively
  • Communicate verbally and in writing
  • Computer and technical skills
  • Creativity
  • Critical thinking
  • Decision making
  • Flexibility in writing and presenting
  • Leadership skills
  • Organizational skills
  • Planning skills

If I study education, I could build a career in various occupations such as:

  • Adult education teacher
  • Alumni relations
  • Athletic coach
  • Athletic director
  • Child life specialist
  • College instructor
  • Corporate trainer
  • Curriculum developer
  • Day care administrator
  • Education management
  • Education materials sales
  • Education resources
  • Education therapist
  • Elementary school teacher
  • English as a second language teacher (ESL)
  • Financial aid counselor
  • First aide trainer
  • Grant writer
  • Guidance counselor
  • Historic site administrator
  • International teaching
  • Kindergarten teacher
  • Librarian
  • Media centre specialist
  • Middle school teacher
  • Museum curator
  • Physical education instructor
  • Preschool administrator
  • Principal
  • Registrar/admissions
  • Resource teacher
  • School psychologist
  • Secondary school teacher
  • Speech pathologist
  • Student admissions
  • Student affairs
  • Superintendents
  • Training specialist
  • Tutor
  • University instructor
  • Vice-principal
  • Vocational rehab counselor
Additional education or certification may be required for some fields and occupations.

Organizations and agencies that employ education graduates include:

  • Colleges
  • Community centres
  • International schools
  • Private schools
  • School boards
  • Universities

Links and professional associations:

Health & Exercise Sciences

Human kinetics is a discipline focused on the study and practice of human movement and exercise and their impact on health and physical performance. The program will help students develop knowledge and practical skills related to community health promotion, chronic disease prevention, and rehabilitation. Students will learn valuable tools, such as lifestyle management, nutritional guidance, and physical activity programming. Human Kinetics graduates will be able to understand and help solve the challenges of building healthy societies from a global perspective that integrates both scientific and social factors.

If I study human kinetics, I could develop abilities to:

  • Analyze data and trends in exercise management
  • Apply practical knowledge to plan nutrition fundamentals
  • Counsel others on lifestyle, health, and fitness
  • Plan and develop personalized exercise programs for healthy populations
  • Understand health lifestyle management tactics
  • Understand, manage, and rehabilitate people with chronic diseases and disabilities through exercise and nutrition applications
  • Utilize listening and problem-solving skills
  • Work independently as well as part of a team

If I study human kinetics, I could build a career in various occupations such as:

Clinical emphasis:

  • Chronic disease rehabilitator/rehabilitation specialist
  • Ergonomist/health and safety officer
  • Exercise physiologist
  • Exercise therapist or trainer
  • Kinesiologist
  • Medical doctor/sports medicine*
  • Nutritionist*
  • Occupations/recreational therapist*
  • Physical therapist*
  • Rehabilitation program director

Health promotional emphasis:

  • Health and social policy director
  • Health and wellness/return to work coordinator
  • Life coach (nutrition and fitness)
  • Managers/coordinators in community centres
  • Program coordinator (e.g. Parks and Recreation Dept.)
  • Public health director

In either area:

  • College instructor*
  • Consultant: job applicants assessment (fitness)
  • Gym manager/owner
  • Physical education teacher*
  • Researcher
  • University professor*
*Additional education or certification may be required for some fields and occupations.

Organizations and agencies that employ human kinetics graduates include:

  • Businesses in health promotion industries
  • Campus health and wellness programs
  • Clinics
  • Corporate health programs
  • Government agencies (e.g. Ministry of Health)
  • Health and fitness clubs
  • Health services (e.g. Interior Health)
  • Integrated health clinics
  • NGO health organizations
  • Nursing homes
  • Pharmaceutical companies
  • Rehabilitation services
  • Research laboratories
  • School districts (e.g. Healthy Living Coordinators)
  • Sport and athlete development programs

Links and professional associations:

Science

The major in biochemistry provides a strong background in biochemistry, biology, and chemistry, giving students the opportunity to move on to graduate school, or work in allied fields such as microbiology, environmental sciences, plant sciences, food science, pharmacology, pharmaceutical sciences, industrial applications of molecular techniques, and biotechnology. This program is also suitable for students who would like a career in health or medical sciences, molecular diagnostics, and government agencies dealing with medical biochemistry. There are three options leading to a major in biochemistry, wine or plant, or medical.

If I study biochemistry, I could develop abilities to:

  • Analyze data and prepare reports
  • Apply computer skills to the analysis and presentation of data
  • Apply methods and techniques, such as microscopy, histochemistry, chromatography, electrophoresis, and spectroscopy
  • Articulate the theory and application of techniques used to address biochemical problems
  • Assist in conducting biological, microbiological, and biochemical tests and laboratory analyses
  • Conduct lab and field research to collect data and samples
  • Describe how cells recognize and communicate with one another
  • Design, synthesize, and test new chemical products (e.g. drugs, foods, fuels, paints, new materials)
  • Measure pollutants in air, water, and soil
  • Observe health and safety practices
  • Think logically, creatively, and independently
  • Understand how biochemistry is used to study and treat disease
  • Understand the biochemistry of gene function

If I study biochemistry, I could build a career in various occupations such as:

  • Analytical chemist
  • Biochemical educator
  • Biochemical researcher
  • Biomedical researcher
  • Biotechnologist
  • Cancer researcher
  • Clinical biochemist
  • Drug development officer
  • Environmental auditor
  • Environmental health officer
  • Food product inspector
  • Food science technologist
  • Forensic analyst
  • Genetic technician
  • Hazardous waste
  • Technologist
  • Immunologist
  • Industrial hygienist
  • Nurse
  • Nutrition researcher
  • Pharmaceutical research assistant
  • Physiotherapist
  • Public health inspector
  • Scientific journalist
  • Toxicology assistant
  • Various careers in medicine and dentistry
  • Wine and beer production technologist
  • Wine scientist
Additional education or certification may be required for some fields and occupations.

Organizations and agencies that employ biochemistry graduates include:

  • Biochemical, biological, engineering, environmental control, health care, or scientific research firms
  • Government ministries, research, or health agencies
  • Manufacturing or processing industries (e.g. agriculture, aquaculture, beverage, biotechnical, chemical, cosmetics, dietary supplements, food, medical instruments, petrochemical, pharmaceutical, wine and brewing)
  • Medical, clinical, or diagnostic laboratories
  • Post-secondary institutions
  • Toxicological sciences, including RCMP and cancer research institutes

Links and professional associations:

The biology major is designed to provide students with an excellent grounding in all fields of biology and the basic practical skills of the working biologist. This program prepares students for graduate school and professional programs. Students graduating from UBC Okanagan with a Bachelor of Science in biology will have a wide variety of practical experience and skills in laboratory and fieldwork, computers, and communications (both oral and written). If students choose to specialize in a subdiscipline of biology, they may complete a concentration in physiology.

If I study biology, I could develop abilities to:

  • Analyze and interpret data
  • Apply biological facts, concepts, and principles
  • Apply computer skills and statistical techniques
  • Assess and solve complex problems
  • Collect and observe data with precision and accuracy
  • Conduct field and lab research
  • Design experiments and projects
  • Follow laboratory procedures and processing with proficiency
  • Meet deadlines
  • Observe health and safety practices
  • Think analytically and critically
  • Understand biological theory in depth
  • Write clear and accurate technical reports

If I study biology, I could build a career in various occupations such as:

  • Agricultural technologist
  • Agrology technician
  • Aquaculture technician
  • Bacteriology technician
  • Bioanalyst
  • Biogeographer
  • Biological laboratory technologist
  • Biostatistician
  • Biotechnologist
  • Botanical technician
  • Conservation officer
  • Environmental educator
  • Environmental impact assessor
  • Fish and wildlife officer
  • Fish hatchery technician
  • Food bacteriological technician
  • Food inspector
  • Food science technologist
  • Forensic biologist
  • Horticulturalist
  • Hydrometric technologist
  • Interpretive naturalist
  • Microbiology quality control technologist
  • Park warden
  • Pathology assistant
  • Pharmaceutical sales representative
  • Plant breeding technician
  • Pollution control technologist
  • Science policy analyst
  • Seed technologist
  • Soil conservationist
  • Toxicologist
  • Wildlife manager
Additional education or certification may be required for some fields and occupations.

Organizations and agencies that employ biology graduates include:

  • Architectural, engineering, and other scientific companies
  • Agricultural, dairy product, cosmetic fertilizer, food, or pharmaceutical manufacturers
  • Coal, oil, gas, and forestry companies
  • Federal, provincial, and municipal laboratories or regulatory agencies
  • Engineering and land appraisal firms
  • Food and beverage processing and manufacturing companies
  • Post-secondary educational institutions
  • Private or public laboratories, including  forensics
  • Service firms to agriculture/agricultural supplied wholesalers
  • Zoos and museums

Links and professional associations:

This program provides students with a comprehensive education in four important areas of chemistry – analytical, inorganic, organic, and physical chemistry – and some specialization in environmental studies. Employment opportunities include positions with environmental consulting firms, environmental departments in industrial operations, analytical laboratories, and environmental regulatory agencies.

If I study chemistry and environmental chemistry, I could develop abilities to:

  • Compile records and interpret experimental or analytical results
  • Comply with health and safety regulations
  • Conduct environmental monitoring and compliance activities
  • Conduct work in a detail-oriented manner
  • Design charts and graphs
  • Display patience and perseverance when conducting research
  • Interpret and predict behaviour of matter
  • Maintain precision and accuracy when conducting research
  • Measure pollution in the air, water, and soil
  • Operate and maintain laboratory equipment and apparatus
  • Prepare solutions of gases and liquids, reagents, and sample formulations
  • Set up and conduct chemical experiments, tests, and analyses using techniques such as chromatography, spectroscopy, physical and chemical separation techniques, and microscopy
  • Think logically, creatively, and independently

If I study chemistry and environmental chemistry, I could build a career in various occupations such as:

  • Brewery laboratory analyst
  • Chemical product developer
  • Chemical technologist
  • Chemistry research assistant
  • Consumer protection specialist
  • Corrosion analyst
  • Cytotechnologist
  • Dangerous substance inspector
  • Environmental chemist
  • Food and drug inspector
  • Food science technologist
  • Forensics specialist
  • Formulation chemist
  • Gene technologist
  • Geochemist
  • Health and safety inspector
  • Industrial chemist
  • Laboratory analyst/coordinator
  • Molecular modeller
  • Occupational safety specialist
  • Pathology assistant
  • Perfumer
  • Pharmaceutical chemist
  • Plant physiologist
  • Pollution control technologist
  • Product tester/analyst
  • Public or industrial health hygienist
  • Quality assurance technician
  • Science writer/translator
  • Soil conservationist/scientist
  • Toxicologist
  • Wastewater treatment chemist
Additional education or certification may be required for some fields and occupations.

Organizations and agencies that employ chemistry and environmental chemistry graduates include:

  • Chemical, petrochemical, mining, metallurgical, agricultural, biotechnology, pharmaceutical, or food industries
  • Educational institutions
  • Electric generation facilities
  • Engineering, gas, mining, or oil extraction firms
  • Environmental protection, monitoring, or consulting organizations
  • Government research laboratories or inspection and maintenance departments
  • Manufacturing firms, including beverages, chemical, cosmetics, drug, electronics, food, glass, packaging, paint, petroleum, pulp/paper, mining, and textile industries
  • Private and public laboratories, including forensics
  • Water, waste or wastewater treatment companies

Links and professional associations:

This program provides students with a comprehensive overview of computer science (data structures, databases, operating systems, software engineering, and numerical methods) while allowing students to explore a variety of courses in computer science, such as artificial intelligence and computer graphics. Students learn how to design and develop software applications, systems, and websites. Employment opportunities are many and varied.

If I study computer science, I could develop abilities to:

  • Apply abstract and formal reasoning
  • Assess, test, troubleshoot, document, upgrade, and develop maintenance procedures for operating systems, communications environments, and applications software
  • Communicate effectively verbally and in writing
  • Design, develop, and test computer-based systems
  • Design human-computer interfaces, multimedia systems, and new techniques for data interpretation
  • Develop and implement software products
  • Meet deadlines
  • Research, evaluate, and synthesize technical information
  • Think analytically, critically, and creatively
  • Understand operating systems
  • Use numerical analysis and mathematical skills
  • Work effectively in team-based environments
  • Work in and analyze various programming languages

If I study computer science, I could build a career in various occupations such as:

  • Application analyst
  • Application developer
  • Bio-informatic technician
  • Computer and network operator
  • Computer games designer
  • Computer graphics developer
  • Computer service technician
  • Console/computer programmer
  • Customer support representative
  • Database analyst
  • Desktop publisher
  • Firmware designer
  • Health information analyst
  • Help desk specialist
  • Interactive media developer
  • IT technician
  • Multimedia designer
  • Network manager
  • Network technician
  • Programming tester
  • Quality control specialist
  • Scientific journalist
  • Security technician
  • Smartphone application developer
  • Software designer/developer
  • Software security analyst
  • Systems tester
  • Technical writer
  • Video game tester/designer
  • Website designer
  • Web technician
Additional education or certification may be required for some fields and occupations.

Organizations and agencies that employ computer science graduates include:

  • Banking, consumer electronics, finance, insurance, multimedia, real estate, and telecommunications businesses
  • Computer consulting, manufacturing, software development, and system design services firms
  • Educational, environment service, and wholesale trade organizations
  • Hardware research and development agencies
  • Health services, medical systems, and operation research agencies (computer modeling, simulation, algorithm)
  • Industrial instrumentation and process control firms
  • Information technology and security departments in private business or governments
  • Public administration departments
  • Social media companies
  • Telecommunications and multimedia corporations

Links and processional associations:

This multidisciplinary program provides courses that ensure a fundamental understanding of past and present relationships among air, water, rocks and minerals, and biota. The emphasis is on the interactions between humans and the environment.

It is intended to prepare students to meet the knowledge requirements for professional designation according to the guidelines of the Canadian Council of Professional Geoscientists (CCPG).

If I study earth and environmental sciences, I could develop abilities to:

  • Analyze and report measurements and observations of air, water, soil, and other resources
  • Collect, analyze, and interpret data
  • Conduct policy and regulatory analysis
  • Develop reasoned and research-supported arguments
  • Evaluate problems and communicate proposed solutions, effectively and scientifically
  • Research and analyze environmental issues including:
    • Human population increases
    • Resource usage and sustainability
    • Environmental degradation caused by pollution and disturbance
    • Endangerment and extinction of species and natural systems

If I study earth and environmental sciences, I could build a career in various occupations such as:

  • Air quality technologist
  • Antipollution measures inspector
  • Dangerous substances inspector
  • Development and production geophysicist
  • Environmental geologist
  • Environmental impact assessor
  • Environmental policy analyst
  • Environmental reporter/writer
  • Environmental standards enforcement officer
  • Environmental technician
  • Farm water coordinator
  • Forest products technologist
  • Geophysicist
  • Hazardous waste planner
  • Hydrologist
  • Hydrometric technologist
  • Industrial hygienist
  • Junior environmentalist
  • Land use analyst
  • Media analyst
  • Occupational hygienist
  • Park warden/naturalist
  • Pollution control technologist
  • Project planner/reclamation worker
  • Public health inspector
  • Regulatory analyst
  • Renewable energy consultant
  • Sanitarian
  • Soil use planner
  • Waste management specialist
  • Water resource manager
  • Wetlands ecologist
  • Wildlife conservationist
  • Wildlife manager
  • Zoning investigator
Additional education or certification may be required for some fields and occupations.

Organizations and agencies that employ earth and environmental sciences graduates include:

  • Agricultural, chemical, fertilizer, food, forestry, metallurgical, mining, petrochemical, and pulp/paper industries
  • Consulting firms specializing in agriculture, groundwater, environmental geography, engineering, archaeology, or geography
  • Environmental education and communication firms
  • Exploration firms, including mineral, geochemistry, and climate prediction
  • Government research laboratories
  • Inspection and maintenance departments
  • International aid organizations
  • Land/resource analysis and management companies
  • Manufacturing, construction, and utility companies
  • Parks and recreation organizations
  • Travel and tourism agencies
  • Water, waste, and wastewater treatment plants

Links and professional associations:

Courses in ecology and evolutionary biology will provide students with grounding in theory, practical experience, and skills in laboratory and field work, computers, and communications (both verbal and written). This program prepares students for graduate school and professional programs.

If I study ecology and evolutionary biology, I could develop abilities to:

  • Analyze and interpret data
  • Apply biological facts, concepts, and principles
  • Apply computer skills and statistical techniques
  • Assess and solve complex problems
  • Collect and observe data with precision and accuracy
  • Conduct field and lab research
  • Design experiments and projects
  • Follow laboratory procedures and processes with proficiency
  • Meet deadlines
  • Observe health and safety practices
  • Think analytically and critically
  • Understand biological theory in depth
  • Write clear and accurate technical reports

If I study ecology and evolutionary biology, I could build a career in various occupations such as:

  • Bioinformatics technician
  • Conservation ecologist
  • Ecological consulting
  • Ecologist
  • Ecotoxicology technologist
  • Entomologist
  • Environmental educator
  • Field ecologist
  • Fisheries manager
  • Forest health survey coordinator
  • Forest products technologist
  • Forestry technician
  • Genetics
  • Geologist
  • Geomorphologist
  • GIS/remote sending technologist
  • Habitat conservationist
  • Horticulturist
  • Integrated pest management
  • Land management specialist
  • Land use analyst
  • Natural resource management
  • Park warden/naturalist
  • Pollution control technologist
  • Project planner/reclamation worker
  • Public policy advisor
  • Regulatory analyst
  • Renewable energy consultant
  • Science writer/journalist
  • Wildlife management office
Additional education or certification may be required for some fields and occupations.

Organizations and agencies that employ ecology and evolutionary biology graduates include:

  • Agricultural, fertilizer, food, forestry, paper/pulp, mining, petrochemical, and food industries
  • Environmental, interpretation, and education consulting firms
  • Government agencies and environmental ministries
  • Non-government conservation and wildlife organizations
  • Universities, colleges, and research institutions

Links and professional associations:

The Bachelor of Science in economics emphasizes the mathematical and quantitative nature of modern economic inquiry that is increasingly required to progress on the graduate studies in economics or to careers in quantitative economic and financial analysis in the public and private sectors. The Bachelor of Science in economics program combines courses in economics, mathematics, and statistics along with other arts and sciences requirements and electives.

If I study economics, I could develop abilities to:

  • Apply statistical methods
  • Collect and organize data using statistical methods
  • Assess and solve complex problems
  • Collect, observe, and interpret data with precision and accuracy
  • Conduct field and lab research
  • Design experiments and projects
  • Follow laboratory procedures and processes with proficiency
  • Foster understanding of freshwater ecosystems
  • Investigate freshwater composition and its interaction with the surrounding environment
  • Investigate properties of freshwater such as temperature, density, plants, and organisms
  • Meet deadlines
  • Records and model topographic features, sediments, and physical composition
  • Think analytically and critically
  • Write clear and accurate technical reports

If I study economics, I could build a career in various occupations such as:

  • Actuarial assistant
  • Benefits administrator
  • Business analyst
  • Claims examiner
  • Commodity/property assessor
  • Compensation analyst
  • Credit/loan administrator
  • Econometric technician
  • Economic forecaster
  • Energy researcher
  • Financial analyst
  • Financial/budget counsellor
  • Health policy planner
  • Insurance claims adjustor
  • Regulatory analyst
  • Research commodity analyst
  • Securities analyst
  • Insurance underwriter trainee
  • Land management specialist
  • Land use analyst
  • Market research analyst
  • Media analyst
  • Operations research analyst
  • Public policy advisor
  • Trust administrator
Additional education or certification may be required for some fields and occupations.

Organizations and agencies that employ economics graduates include:

  • Compensation consulting firms
  • Enterprise risk management companies
  • Environmental liability firms
  • Financial planning and investing firms
  • Government departments involved in agriculture, business, finance, gaming, labour, liquor control, transportation, urban economics, and international trade
  • Life property, and casualty insurance companies
  • Public sector organizations such as workers’ compensation board and health authorities

Links and professional associations

This program prepares students for careers related to inland aquatic ecosystems. The freshwater science program integrates and synthesizes aquatic aspects of biology, chemistry, geography, and earth and environmental sciences. Students will study water quality and quantity, aquatic organisms, and the health of aquatic ecosystems. In the fourth year of the program, all students undertake an individual project in their area of interest, and participate in a group research project under the direction of the project coordinator.

If I study freshwater sciences, I could develop abilities to:

  • Analyze and interpret data
  • Apply computer skills and statistical techniques
  • Assess and solve complex problems
  • Collect, observe, and interpret data with precision and accuracy
  • Conduct field and lab research
  • Design experiments and projects
  • Follow laboratory procedures and processes with proficiency
  • Foster understanding of freshwater ecosystems
  • Investigate freshwater composition and its interaction with the surrounding environment
  • Investigate properties of freshwater such as temperature, density, plants, and organisms
  • Meet deadlines
  • Records and model topographic features, sediments, and physical composition
  • Think analytically and critically
  • Write clear and accurate technical reports

If I study freshwater science, I could build a career in various occupations such as:

  • Aquaculturist
  • Aquatic/ecology station director
  • Conservation and fishery officer
  • Ecologist
  • Ecosystem management technician
  • Ecotourism operator
  • Environment Canada analyst
  • Environment auditor
  • Environmental education specialist
  • Fish products inspector
  • Fisheries biologist
  • Fisheries specialist
  • Hatchery specialist
  • Hydrometric technologist
  • Interpretive naturalist
  • Land conservation manager
  • Marine educator
  • Marine historian
  • Natural resource officer
  • Pollution control technologist
  • Primary production manager
  • Remediation specialist
  • Restoration biologist
Additional education or certification may be required for some fields and occupations.

Organizations and agencies that employ freshwater science graduates include:

  • Aquaculture, agricultural, food, forestry, gas, mining, oil, petro-chemical, or pulp/paper industries
  • Department of Fisheries and Oceans Canada – Freshwater Institute
  • Engineering and environmental consulting firms
  • Environment Canada’s National Water Research Institute (NWRI)
  • Environmental monitoring or protection agencies
  • Geology and engineering consulting firms
  • Government and private laboratories
  • Inspection facilities
  • Utility generation companies
  • Water, stream flow, and wastewater treatment stations

Links and professional associations:

This program provides a comprehensive undergraduate science education with the opportunity for concentration in two or three of the following subject areas: biochemistry, biology, chemistry, earth and environmental sciences, mathematical sciences, and physics.

The general science degree is appropriate for students planning to continue study in professional areas, such as post-secondary education, business administration, dentistry, law, medicine, or veterinary medicine. In particular, this program provides excellent preparation for prospective secondary school teachers. It is not generally intended for students planning to continue to graduate studies in science; however, with careful planning and high academic achievement, it is possible to enter a science graduate program, although additional qualifying studies may be required for some universities.

If I study general science, I could develop abilities to:

  • Analyze and interpret data
  • Apply computer skills and statistical techniques
  • Apply scientific facts, concepts, and principles
  • Assess and solve complex problems
  • Collect and observe data with precision and accuracy
  • Conduct field and lab research
  • Design experiments and projects
  • Follow laboratory procedures and processes with proficiency
  • Meet deadlines
  • Observe health and safety practices
  • Think analytically and critically
  • Understand various scientific theories in depth
  • Write clear and accurate technical reports

If I study general sciences, I could build a career in various occupations such as:

  • Agrology technician
  • Antipollution measure inspector
  • Dangerous substance inspector
  • Ecologist
  • Enforcement officer
  • Entry-level supervisor
  • Environmental auditor
  • Environmental geologist
  • Environmental impact assessor
  • Environmental policy analyst
  • Environmental reporter/writer
  • Environmental sanitarian
  • Environmental standards officer
  • Environmental technician
  • Farm water coordinator
  • Field geologist
  • Forest products technologist
  • Geochemist
  • Geologist
  • Geomorphologist
  • Geophysicist
  • Glacial geologist
  • Horticulturist
  • Hydrogeologist
  • Hydrometric technologist
  • Industrial hygienist
  • Junior environmentalist
  • Land management specialist
  • Land use analyst
  • Media analyst
  • Park warden/naturalist
  • Pollution control technologist
  • Project planner/reclamation worker
  • Public policy advisor
  • Regulatory analyst
  • Renewable energy consultant
Additional education or certification may be required for some fields and occupations.

Organizations and agencies that employ general science graduates include:

  • Business
  • Consulting firms
  • Government
  • Hospital or laboratories
  • Manufacturing or processing industries
  • Parks and recreation organizations
  • Schools and other educational organizations
  • Technical firms

Links and professional associations:

This program provides students with a solid grounding in the mathematical sciences, including mathematics, statistics, and computer science. While maintaining a strong core in mathematics, the program allows students to emphasize mathematics, statistics, computer science, or any combination of the three.

If I study mathematics and mathematical sciences, I could develop abilities to:

  • Analyze, interpret, and summarize data using computer software
  • Apply mathematical principles to the collection, analysis, and presentation of numerical data
  • Apply quantitative knowledge and reasoning to theoretical and applied sciences
  • Apply statistical methods to survey development and analysis
  • Build mathematical models of realworld systems to formulate and solve practical problems
  • Design surveys and experiments
  • Establish and control hypothetical designs
  • Find computational errors
  • Forecast sales, analyze business conditions, and help solve management problems
  • Gather, compile, analyze, and interpret economic and statistical data
  • Identify relationships among factors
  • Make and break codes
  • Measure distances, sizes, and relationships, perform complex calculations, and analyze probabilities
  • Think logically and analytically
  • Utilize statistical software

If I study mathematics and mathematical sciences, I could build a career in various occupations such as:

  • Account manager
  • Actuary
  • Applied mathematician
  • Auditor
  • Bank loan or trust officer
  • Benefits administrator
  • Biostatistician
  • Budget analyst
  • Commodity manager
  • Computer scientist
  • Credit analyst
  • Cryptographer (mathematical security)
  • Compensation consultant
  • Data analyst
  • Economist
  • Enterprise risk manager
  • Financial analyst
  • Industry researcher
  • Insurance underwriter
  • Inventory control specialist
  • Investment analyst
  • Market analyst
  • Mathematical technician
  • Operations research analyst
  • Pollster
  • Public health statistician
  • Purchasing agent
  • Quantitative analyst
  • Revenue Canada investigator
  • Risk assessor
  • Robotics programmer
  • Statistician
  • Systems analyst
  • Wage analyst
Additional education or certification may be required for some fields and occupations.

Organizations and agencies that employ mathematics and mathematical sciences graduates include:

  • Businesses providing market research, pension/benefit, and actuarial services
  • Computer, mining, pharmaceutical, resource, software design, and utility companies
  • Consulting or securities firms
  • Insurance companies, including life, health, property/casualty, and reinsurance
  • Financial institutions, including banks, credit unions, trust companies, and mutual and pension fund firms
  • Manufacturers and other companies requiring process improvement
  • Medical and educational research agencies
  • Post-secondary institution
  • Provincial, territorial, band, and other levels of government offices
  • Science and engineering consulting firms
  • Statistics Canada and other federal government departments

Links and professional associations:

The major in microbiology provides students with a breadth of knowledge in microbiology as it applied to health sciences, the environment, and industry. Students graduating with a Bachelor of Science in microbiology will have developed a wide range of lab, communication, and critical thinking skills.

This program will prepare students for careers in microbiology (e.g. food and beverage industries, health sciences, and environmental sciences), graduate school, and professional programs (e.g. medicine and dentistry).

If I study microbiology, I could develop abilities to:

  • Analyze and interpret data
  • Apply microbiological facts, concepts, and principles
  • Apply computer skills and statistical techniques
  • Assess and solve complex problems
  • Catalogue/categorize information
  • Collect and observe data with precision and accuracy
  • Conduct research into the structure, function, ecology, biotechnology, pathology, and genetics of micro-organisms
  • Design experiments and projects
  • Follow laboratory procedures and processes with proficiency
  • Make projections for data and research findings
  • Observe health and safety practices
  • Record observations
  • Think analytically and critically
  • Understand biological theory in depth
  • Understand the health implications of microbial infections

If I study microbiology, I could build a career in various occupations such as:

  • Bacteriology technician
  • Bioanalyst
  • Biochemistry technologist
  • Biomediation specialist
  • Biotechnology assistant
  • Dental sciences
  • Environmental scientist
  • Food bacteriological technician
  • Food microbiologist
  • Food products technologists
  • Forensic laboratory analyst
  • Infectious disease control specialist
  • Medical sciences
  • Microbiologist
  • Microbiology quality control technologist
  • Molecular biologist
  • Nursing sciences
  • Patent agent
  • Pathology assistant
  • Pollution control technologist
  • Project planner
  • Public health inspector
  • Public policy advisor
  • Reclamation scientist
  • Registered professional biologist
  • Renewable energy consultant
  • Science policy analyst
  • Toxicologist
  • Waste management specialist
Additional education or certification may be required for some fields and occupations.

Organizations and agencies that employ microbiology graduates include:

  • Agricultural quality control industries
  • Bio-remediation facilities
  • Biotech facilities
  • College and university laboratories
  • Forestry companies
  • Hospitals, including diagnostic facilities
  • Laboratories monitoring water quality
  • Municipal, provincial, and federal governments
  • Toxicology laboratories
  • Industries such as pharmaceutical, pulp and paper, wine, breweries, dairies, petrochemical, fertilizer, mining, and food processing, or other natural products

Links and professional associations:

This program aims to provide a comprehensive physics education with considerable emphasis on both theoretical foundations and laboratory practice.

The senior laboratory components consist of long-range projects rather than prescribed exercises, to encourage initiative on the part of the students and to prepare him or her for the inventive atmosphere of modern high-tech industry.

If I study physics and astronomy, I could develop abilities to:

  • Apply principles of physics to understand and solve problems in different fields (e.g. aerospace, health, mining, technology)
  • Conduct field observations
  • Complete programming and systems analysis
  • Design and perform experiments with specialized equipment (e.g. lasers and spectrometers)
  • Examine theories and how galaxies cluster into large-scale structures in the early universe
  • Explain laws describing the force of nature, such as gravity, electromagnetism, and nuclear interactions
  • Explain the formation and evolution of the planets, the solar system, stars, galaxies, and the universe itself
  • Explore and identify basic principles governing matter, energy, and the interaction of matter and energy
  • Design and perform experiments with lasers, particle accelerators, telescopes, mass spectrometers, and other equipment
  • Establish and control experimental designs
  • Measure chemical composition of stars and mass of galaxy clusters
  • Study data gathered by physicists using particle accelerators
  • Study the behaviour and forces of elementary particles
  • Synthesize complex information and make projections
  • Think analytically and creatively
  • Utilize mathematical formulas
  • Write precise technical reports

If I study physics and astronomy, I could build a career in various occupations such as:

  • Acoustic physicist
  • Aerodynamicist
  • Applied physicist research assistant
  • Astronomer
  • Biophysicist
  • Core technology scientist
  • Crystallographer
  • Flight management analyst
  • Geophysicist
  • Health physicist
  • Hydrologist
  • Industrial physicist
  • Manufacturing project leader
  • Meteorologist
  • Nanotechnology
  • Planetarium director/guide
  • Radiation protection inspector
  • Scientific photographer
  • Systems analyst
  • Telecommunications technician
  • Telescope operator
Additional education or certification may be required for some fields and occupations.

Organizations and agencies that employ physics and astronomy graduates include:

  • Government agencies or departments in aeronautics or defense
  • Manufacturing firms in fields including aerospace, aeronautics, communications, computer, electronics, medical instrumentation, navigation/guidance systems, noise pollution, scientific supply, oil and gas extraction, and other high-tech fields
  • Observations, planetaria, and science centres/museums
  • Organizations or non-profit foundations involved in public education

Links and professional associations:

Students gain a broad perspective in psychology with courses in such diverse areas as bio-psychology, cognitive, developmental, social, and abnormal psychology. In addition, students gain an understanding and appreciation of the empirical method as it is applied across the disciplines.

Most careers in psychology, whether research, clinical, applied, or academic psychology, required a graduate degree. Students may choose from biology, cognitive, and research design and statistics concentrations.

If I study psychology, I could develop abilities to:

  • Assist in conducting controlled laboratory experiments
  • Conduct research on the physical, cognitive, emotional, or social aspects of human behaviour, under appropriate supervision
  • Develop excellent interpersonal and communication skills
  • Exhibit empathy toward others
  • Foster group dynamics at a beginning level
  • Gather information through observation, interviews, questionnaires, clinical studies, surveys, and the administration of personality, performance, aptitude, and intelligence tests under appropriate supervision.
  • Interpret and explain scientific research
  • Organize people, equipment, and ideas
  • Perceive, understand, and explain individual differences
  • Resolve and mediate conflicts at a beginning level
  • Understand and explain human and group behaviour and development
  • Understand ethical practice guidelines
  • Understand group behaviour and dynamics
  • Use interpersonal and listening skills
  • Work effectively in groups and be an effective leader

If I study psychology, I could build a career in various occupations such as:

  • Activity coordinator
  • Addiction support worker
  • Animal trainer
  • Athletic coach or instructor
  • Behavioural analyst
  • Child/youth care worker
  • Community relations director
  • Correctional centre caseworker
  • Customs inspector
  • Day treatment caseworker
  • Drug abuse and prevention worker
  • Ergonomist
  • Group home coordinator
  • Hospice health worker
  • Human rights advisor
  • Immigration officer
  • Like skills coach
  • Marketing research assistant
  • Mental health worker
  • Motivational research assistant
  • Program coordinator
  • Occupational hygienist technologist
  • Parole/probation officer
  • Public relations representative
  • Research assistant
  • Residential support worker
  • Training consultant
  • Treatment facilities support staff
  • Youth and family support worker
Additional education or certification may be required for some fields and occupations.

Organizations and agencies that employ Psychology graduates include:

  • Addictions, community, counselling, family, healing and wellness, and social service agencies
  • First Nation band offices, focusing on health, community, education, and support services
  • Correctional, young offender, and treatment facilities
  • Regional Health Authorities, including health care and rehabilitation clinics, and hospitals

Links and professional associations:

The zoology major is designed to provide students with an excellent grounding in all fields of zoology and the basic practical skills of the working zoologist. This program prepares students for graduate school and professional programs. Students graduating from UBC’s Okanagan campus with a Bachelor of Science in Zoology will have a wide variety of practical experience and skills in laboratory and fieldwork, computers, and communications (both oral and written).

If I study zoology, I could develop abilities to:

  • Analyze and interpret data
  • Apply biological facts, concepts, and principles
  • Apply computer skills and statistical techniques
  • Assess and solve complex problems
  • Collect and observe data with precision and accuracy
  • Conduct field and lab research
  • Design experiments and projects
  • Follow laboratory procedures and processes with proficiency
  • Meet deadlines
  • Observe health and safety practices
  • Think analytically and critically
  • Understand biological theory in depth
  • Write clear and accurate technical reports

If I study zoology, I could build a career in various occupations such as:

  • Agrology technician
  • Animal care technician
  • Aquaculture technician
  • Bacteriology technician
  • Bioanalyst
  • Biogeographer
  • Biological laboratory technologist
  • Biostatistician
  • Biotechnologist
  • Conservation officer
  • Environmental educator
  • Environmental impact assessor
  • Fish and wildlife officer
  • Fish hatchery technician
  • Food inspector
  • Forensic biologist
  • Hydrometric technologist
  • Interpretive naturalist
  • Microbiology quality control technologist
  • Park warden
  • Pathology assistant
  • Pharmaceutical sales representative
  • Pollution control technologist
  • Science policy analyst
  • Soil conservationist
  • Toxicologist
  • Wildlife manager
  • Zookeeper
Additional education or certification may be required for some fields and occupations.

Organizations and agencies that employ zoology graduates include:

  • Agricultural, dairy product, cosmetic, fertilizer, good, and pharmaceutical manufacturers
  • Architectural, engineering, and other science-based companies
  • Coal, oil, gas, and forestry companies
  • Engineering and land appraisal firms
  • Federal, provincial, and municipal laboratories or regulatory agencies
  • Food and beverage processing and manufacturing companies
  • Post-secondary educational institutions
  • Private or public laboratories, including forensics
  • Service firms to agriculture/agricultural supplied wholesalers
  • Zoos and museums

Links and professional associations: