Current programs

Global health practicum: Ghana and Zambia

This program is open to nursing students only.

Applications for this program are now closed.

UBC Okanagan undergraduate nursing students have the opportunity to work with diverse populations internationally in low- and middle-income countries. This consolidated practice experience is designed to provide opportunities for students to integrate, consolidate, and expand on concepts from previous learning.

This year, we will be offering one practicum in either Ghana or Zambia. The global health practicum is focused on community development, providing students the opportunity to gain insight into global health issues and cultural safety.

Students choosing to participate in this practicum will work in a variety of settings, including: rural and remote community health clinics, government funded health centres, school and university settings, and a number of non-government organizations.

International practice placements cannot be guaranteed. If circumstances or political situations change, the experience may be cancelled, or students may be called back from the experience. If this occurred you would complete NRSG 434 in Canada and we would do our best to fully refund you of your program fee.

Information session presentation (PDF)

The general timeline for this five-week practice placement is early-March to mid-April, 2019 (including travel time). Exact dates will be confirmed by November. Prior to departure there is one week of mandatory seminars (3).

Week one:

Preparatory seminars and labs (Kelowna and then approx. three days travel time to location).

Week two to five:

Practicum begins. Students will be rotated through various settings throughout the four weeks in the country and then a debrief before coming home. Students may continue with personal travel following completion of the practicum in the country.

Practicum should be complete by mid-April 2019.

Review the out of region practice placement guideline (PDF). You must meet the out-of-region requirements to be considered for a Global Health placement. In addition, the following requirements must be met:

  • Students in good academic standing that have successfully completed Nursing 431.
  • Membership and evidence of participation in the Global Nursing Citizens club.
  • GPA above 72%.
  • Consistent satisfactory practice in all domains on midterm and final practice evaluations.
  • Exemplary attendance record in practice courses.
  • No records of unprofessional conduct.
  • Proof of current CPR.

If you have any questions about eligibility email Jeanette Vinek from the School of Nursing (jeanette.vinek@ubc.ca).

Program fees will be between $2,500 to $3,100. The final fee is dependent on the number of students in the program.

Note: The program fee will be offset by $1,000 for UBC students qualifying for the Go Global Award (e.g. those students with a 70% average in their best 9 credits from Term 1 of the 2018-19 academic year). If you have any pass/fail courses, we will assess your average with advice from your faculty.

Included in program fee Not included in program fee
  • Accommodations
  • Most on-site transportation
  • Entrance fees*
  • Guest lectures
  • Go Global fee
  • Flight
  • UBC tuition
  • Meals
  • Health or travel insurance
  • Immunizations (if necessary)
  • Visas (if necessary)
  • Personal spending money for communications, snacks, souvenirs, etc.

*Cultural performances, national parks entrance (site specific), and other group activities.

NRSG 439 (8):

Global Health Practicum

Advanced practicum provides opportunities to engage in an immersive global health experience in a variety of settings*. Students will practice in collaboration with global health partners. The focus is on application of global health and cultural safety competencies. Pass/Fail.

*Dependent on availability and cost of travel is in addition to course tuition.

Prerequisite: All of NRSG 421, NRSG 422, NRSG 429, NRSG 432, and approval of application

Community, creativity, and communications: Tanzania

Applications for this program are now closed.

This year’s program will be facilitated by Faculty of Creative & Critical Studies and Faculty of Management instructor Joanna Cockerline.

What does travel and travel writing enable us to explore — about not only the places and people we encounter, but also about ourselves? How are places represented and people’s stories told — or not told? How can sharing diverse ideas and perspectives lead to understanding and mutual benefits across disciplines and across cultures? How can creative and cultural production inspire social change and community building, both locally and interculturally? This experiential program, based out of the village of Nguruma, Tanzania, explores such questions — and much more.

Living and learning at a small, locally-owned guest lodge, students will stay in one of East Africa’s most geographically captivating regions. Our home for four weeks in rural Tanzania is the Vijiji Center, just outside the East African hub of Arusha, the city at the base of Mount Kilimanjaro. Options for hiking, biking, creative writing, artistic production, and photography abound.

Students will benefit from experiential learning alongside opportunities to consider a vast range of social initiatives, contemporary cultural productions, forms of creative expression, and community-building strategies. From excursions to artisans’ collectives and local markets to screenings of leading-edge African independent films, as well as exploring some of Africa’s most compelling wildlife reserves, students will immerse themselves in diverse experiences, while developing a range of interdisciplinary and intercultural communication skills.

For some information on previous Global Seminar Programs that have run to Tanzania, view the video below. Note: this year’s focus will be different from previous years.

May 13 to June 7, 2019

Note: Prior to the portion of the program held in Tanzania, there will be pre-departure materials and training, and a one-week distance education preparation and reading course component starting May 7.

Learning from diverse voices — such as community leaders, local farmers, storytellers, artists, and innovators of cultural production in East Africa — we will visit culturally and ecologically unique communities and places. From a nearby Maasai villages to wildlife parks, grassroots community initiatives to works by writers and leading-edge film makers, students will have opportunities to engage with interdisciplinary and intercultural perspectives that go beyond conventional borders.

Week one: 

  • Orientation to the Nguruma Village, Vijiji Center, local Meru culture, and Swahili language.
  • Excursions to local women’s produce markets, coffee-growing regions, family farms, and wildlife reserves, with experiences ranging from cooking traditional foods to writing and photography.
  • Read and discuss travel writing, journalism, and fiction about and from East Africa.

Week two:

  • Overnight stay in a Maasai village, with cultural activities and insights.
  • Excursions to Lake Duluti Forest Reserve and local educational, social enterprise, and cultural initiatives such as the Sing’si Village pottery workshop.
  • Workshops on writing skill development and interdisciplinary communications.
  • Continue to consider travel writing and ethics, challenges of representation, East African literature and storytelling, interdisciplinary communications, and contemporary local culture.

 Week three:

  • Wildlife safari in Tarangire National Park.
  • Guest speakers and/or performances, plus contemporary East African films and documentaries.
  • Workshops on writing and interdisciplinary communications, with peer editing opportunities plus individualized feedback from the Program Director.

Week four:

  • Lake Manyara National Park.
  • Cultural, environmental, and wildlife reserve excursions to align with students’ project interests.
  • Community dinner.

All weeks of the program will include:

  • Excursions and involvement with cultural, artistic, environmental, and/or social initiatives.
  • Classroom instruction in writing and communication skills applicable to various disciplines.
  • Reading and discussion of travel writing, regional and international fiction, non-fiction, and diverse forms of creative and cultural production.
  • Opportunities for student-defined projects and/or creative production.
  • Options for hiking, biking, creative writing, artistic production, and photography.
  • Workshopping, discussion, and feedback in a small cohort of 15 to 20 UBC students total.
  • Individualized one-on-one skill development and meetings with the Program Director.

Prerequisite: At least one 100-level English course (such as ENGL 112, ENGL 114, ENGL 150, ENGL 151, or 153) or APSC 176.

Students from all disciplines and degree programs are encouraged to apply.

Program fees will be between $3,400 to $3,700*.

*The final program fee depends on the number of students in the program.

Note: The program fee will be offset by $1,000 for UBC students qualifying for the Go Global Award (e.g. those students with a 70% average from the best nine credits during the 2018-19 academic year). If you have any pass/fail courses, we will assess your average with advice from your faculty.

Included in program fee Not included in program fee
  • Accommodations
  • On-site group transportation
  • Some meals
  • Entrance fees
  • Guest lectures
  • Go Global fee
  • Flight
  • UBC tuition
  • Remainder of meals
  • Health or travel insurance
  • Immunizations (if necessary)
  • Visas (if necessary)
  • Personal spending money for communications, snacks, souvenirs, etc.)

The program is comprised of two courses students will take concurrently. Successful program completion will earn six (6) 300-level arts elective credits during summer Term 1.

ENGL 395C:

Examine travel writing, journalism, social issues, environmental challenges, and East African literature, storytelling, and film, alongside the intersections between cultural production and empowerment.

ENGL 395D:

Examine opportunities and strategies for interdisciplinary and intercultural communication, enabling students to develop their own writing and communication skills, specific to their discipline but also with a focus on communicating beyond it.

Sport for development: India

Empowering children through sport and play

Applications for this program are now closed.

This year’s program will be led by Dr. Stephen Berg.

This is an immersion service-learning course that enables students to work with the NGO YFC Rurka Kalan, a community based and community driven initiative in the areas of sports, youth development, health, education, and skill development. YFC works in three districts of Punjab, a state of India that shares its border with Pakistan. The following provides a description of YFC Rurka Kalan’s initiatives where students have the opportunity to plan, observe, and teach:

  • Pragati – Sports for Development Project
  • Lakshya – Sports for Excellence Project
  • Vidya – Education Project
  • Hunar – Skill Development Project
  • Prerna – Children with Special Needs Therapy and Physiotherapy Centre

Details of each project are delineated below and students have the opportunity to work in one or several projects:

Project Pragati:

Pragati means development in English. Pragati is YFC Rurka Kalan’s flagship Sports for Development Project (S4D). It is being run in 40 villages/schools and all the 4000 youth/children enrolled in YFC’s various programs attend these sessions. The program is intended to change deep-seated attitudes, behaviours and practices, and is activity based. Young people selected and trained from the communities themselves deliver these sessions. The primary domains of YFC’s S4D program are: Education and skill development; health; gender; and prevention of substance abuse. The activity/session curriculum is designed in such a way that positive messages are always reinforced.

Project Lakshya:

The English word for Lakshya is target. Apart from running soccer, wrestling, and Kabaddi Academies for day trainees, YFC Rurka Kalan has a residential training centre for 40 talented but needy soccer players from around the country. This residential facility provides boarding, lodging, education, and other facilities so that these children can attain their full potential. As part of sports for excellence program, football training is provided to the children and youth in more than 20 schools/community centers.

  • Sports training sessions of girls and boys as a coach/instructor
  • Motivational lectures
  • Organize small festivals/competitions

Project Vidya:

In Hindi, the word for wisdom or knowledge is Vidya. The education project is based on values that encourage critical thinking, questioning mind, scientific temperament, creativity, imagination, and holistic development. YFC Rurka Kalan works with Government schools of the area and entails: Supporting schools with Teaching Assistants/Youth Mentors; supporting schools in organizing sports events; and supporting schools in developing and delivering sports curriculum. YFC is also working on a curriculum/content for its beneficiaries (a continuous process) wherein all the beneficiaries have to attain a minimum level of understanding of different subjects to start with and then go on to higher levels.

  • Educational classes in schools and at the Academy
  • Curriculum Planning

Project Hunar: 

Under the Hunar (‘Skill’) Project, YFC Rurka Kalan provides technology education to boys and girls. Courses offered are a Post Graduate Diploma in Computer Application (PGDCA) and a Diploma in Information Technology (DIT). The YFC Computer Centre is affiliated with Punjab Information & Communication Technology Corporation Ltd.

  • Personality Development and Communication skills training

Project Prerna:

Under project Prerna, YFC runs a specialized centre for physiotherapy and rehabilitation that not only caters to orthopaedic issues of the aged and sports persons but also includes therapeutic treatment, inclusive education, and physiotherapy for children with special needs. This centre is fully equipped with the latest high quality electro diagnostic and electrotherapeutic modalities for Orthopaedic, Sports Rehab, Neurological Rehab, and Paediatrics Rehab. The centre has highly skilled, qualified, and experienced staff including physiotherapists who provide an accurate diagnosis and efficient and effective treatment for a whole range of not only physical issues and sports injuries, but also caters to the rehabilitation and therapeutic needs of children.

  • Help the therapists to work with children with special needs.

May 6 to 24, 2019

Week one:

Introduction to Rurka Kalan, YFC Rurka Kalan and its five projects associated with education and sport. Students will rotate through each project (one day per project) to gain a better understanding of what is involved. Students will observe, reflect, and begin initial planning as to the project(s) to volunteer for. Field excursion at the end of the week will be to the city of Amritsar to visit the Golden Temple.

Week two:

Students will begin to immerse themselves into the project areas of interest. Observations, planning, and some possible co- teaching/mentoring will occur during this week. Personal and group reflection sessions will be part of the experience. A field excursion to Dharamshala, India home of the Dalai Lama will take place at the end of week two.

Week three:

Final week of involvement in one or more of YFC Rurka Kalan’s projects. Students will be immersed in planning and co-teaching/mentoring in one or more of YFC Rurka Kalan’s five projects. Opportunities to observe other students in project teaching will also occur during this last week. At the end of week three, interested participants can take part in a planned trip to New Delhi and then a guided tour of the Taj Mahal.

An interest in working with children and youth in education, sport, and recreational settings is important but previous study isn’t required.

Program fees will be between $3,000 to $3,200*.

*The final program fee depends on the number of students in the program.

Note: The program fee will be offset by $1,000 for UBC students qualifying for the Go Global Award (e.g. those students with a 70% average from the best nine credits during the 2018-19 academic year). If you have any pass/fail courses, we will assess your average with advice from your faculty.

Included in program fee Not included in program fee
  • Accommodations
  • On-site group transportation
  • Some meals
  • Entrance fees
  • Guest lectures
  • Go Global fees
  • Some excursion costs
  • Flight
  • UBC tuition
  • Remainder of meals
  • Health or travel insurance
  • Immunizations (if necessary)
  • Visas (if necessary)
  • Personal spending money for communications, snacks, and souvenirs, etc.

EDUC 442:

Community Field Experience (for Education students)

EDUC 462 (3 credits):

For non-Education students

EDUC 462 will satisfy the HMKN 401 practicum requirement. For those wishing to do a second practicum, you will still be eligible to take HMKN 402.

Program is open to students from both Okanagan and Vancouver.

Geographies of migration and settlement: Europe, Africa, and Asia at a crossroads

Lisbon, Azores Islands, and Canary Islands

Applications for this program are now closed.

This year’s program will be run by Dr. Carlos Teixeira.

The cross-border movement of populations is not a phenomenon unique to our contemporary world. However, in the last decades of the 20th century and in the first decade of the 21st century, goods, information, services, financial capital, and human beings have been moving across national borders at a level unprecedented in human history. Of these flows, population mobility remains the most regulated, complex, and controversial.

International migration has traditionally been considered to be a combination of “push” factors from countries of origin — including economic desperation, political or religious persecution, and/or population pressure — and “pull” factors from destination countries — including economic opportunities and/or political or religious freedom (Castles, De Haas and Miller 2014). Historically, immigrants have tended to be seen as able-bodied, poorly educated, low-skill labourers migrating from less-developed countries in the hope of making a living in destination countries while sending money back to family in their home countries.

While these stereotypical views of immigrants are still widely held in some quarters, the stereotype belies the reality of diversity among contemporary immigrant populations. At the same time, it must be noted that many developed countries (e.g., Western European countries like Spain and Portugal) experienced decreasing natural population growth in recent decades, making their immigration policies an integral part of their population and economic policies (Castles, De Haas and Miller 2014).

In contrast, some African countries, including Morocco, continue to lose parts of their populations through “voluntary” and/or “involuntary” migration to Europe as well as to other parts of the world. These trends suggest that contemporary international migration has become much more complex than in earlier periods of history, and that “sending” and “receiving” countries of immigrants as well as immigrant profiles have been increasingly diversified (Castles, De Hass and Miller 2014). The present refugee crisis facing the world as a whole but the European Union — as a major “reception area” for refugees from different parts of the world, including the Middle East and Africa — in particular, makes Western Europe, including Spain and Portugal, excellent “social laboratories” to study geographies of migration and settlement.

This course provides a broad introduction to the multiple aspects of international population movements in the modern world. Particular attention is paid to the analysis of international regimes regulating migration, “voluntary” and “involuntary/forced” migration; changes in global demographics, immigration policies of nation states, international migration patterns, settlement policies and the imprint of (legal and illegal) immigration in European and African cities and the future of migration in Europe (reception areas of migration) and the Middle East and Africa (sending regions/countries of immigrants and refugees). Case studies of specific immigration policies and settlement services to immigrants and refugees will be drawn mainly from the experience of Western European countries.

May 4 to 29, 2019

Learning from diverse voices — ranging from community leaders, local farmers, village elders, storytellers, artists, to innovators of cultural production in East Africa — we will visit culturally and ecologically unique communities and places. From a nearby Maasai villages to wildlife parks, grassroots community initiatives to works and performances by writers and leading-edge film makers, students will have opportunities to engage with interdisciplinary and intercultural perspectives that go beyond conventional borders.

Week one (may 4 to 11):

Autonomous Region of Azores, Portugal (Island of Sao Miguel, City of Ponta Delgada)

Visits to museums (e.g. Azorean Immigration Museum) and local neighbourhoods/districts. Also we will attend meetings/workshops at government [e.g. Regional Department for Azorean Communities abroad (D.R.C.) and NGOs (e.g. AIPA and ARRISCA)] as well as at the local university (University of Azores) dealing with migration and population issues, including immigration policies and settlement services to immigrants and deportees (Azoreans who left the islands for U.S. and Canada at a young age and then were deported to the islands).

Week two (May 11 to 18):

Canary Islands, Spain (Island of Gran Canaria, City of Las Palmas)

Visit to the historical town, museums and local neighbourhoods/districts. Also we will attend meetings/workshops at government and NGOs as well as at a local university (Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria) dealing with migration and population issues in the Canary islands/Spain as well as in Africa.

Week three (May 18 to 29):

City of Lisbon (Portugal)

Visits to historical towns (e.g. Historic Centre of Evora and/or the Cultural Landscape of Sintra, UNESCO World Heritage sites), museums and local neighbourhoods/districts. Also we will attend meetings/workshops at government and NGOs as well as at local universities [University of Lisbon (IGOT/Geography Department and CES/Centre for Social Studies) and Open University (Department of Migration Studies)] dealing with migration and population issues, including immigration policies and settlement services to immigrants and refugees in Europe.

An interest in geography is important, but previous study is not required.

Program fees will be between $3,400 to $3,600*.

*The final program fee depends on the number of students in the program.

Note: The program fee will be offset by $1,000 for UBC students qualifying for the Go Global Award (e.g. those students with a 70% average from the best nine credits during the 2018-19 academic year). If you have any pass/fail courses, we will assess your average with advice from your faculty.

Included in program fee Not included in program fee
  • Accommodations
  • On-site group transportation
  • Some meals
  • Entrance fees
  • Guest lectures
  • Go Global fee
  • Flight
  • UBC tuition
  • Remainder of meals
  • Health or travel insurance
  • Immunization (if necessary)
  • Visas (if necessary)
  • Personal spending money for communications, snacks, souvenirs, etc.

GEOG 353 (3 credits):

Geographies of Migration and Settlement: Europe, Africa, and Asia at a Crossroads

The city shaped: Interpreting urban landscapes in Central Italy

Applications for this program are now closed.

This year’s program will be facilitated by Irving K. Barber School of Arts and Sciences Geography Associate Professor Dr. Bernard Momer.

Cities are complex entities that tell stories, however, few of us know how to interpret them. This course explores how the transformation of urban landscapes over time and space can be understood as well as identifies the various concepts, methods, and theories that contextualise these transformative processes. Students will be provided with the tools necessary to observe, analyse, and interpret urban landscapes in a historical and contemporary context. By considering urban form as a receptacle of meaning, the rituals of everyday life, and the vagaries of history, students will gain an understanding of the forces that have shaped and still shape our cities today.

This course is of particular interest to students who are considering careers or with a strong interest in urban planning, urban geography, urban design, urban history, or architecture.

Program Content (Learning Outcomes):

  • Define urban morphology
  • Identify the morphological components of the Renaissance and Baroque City
  • Describe the role of the Italian piazza in the evolution of urban spaces
  • Employ visual analysis to document urban landscapes
  • Interpret urban landscape as a form of cultural production linked to changes in economic patterns, social behaviours, and technological innovations
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the history of the Italian city
  • Demonstrate competencies in the analysis of urban structure
  • Understand the role of everyday activities on the formation of urban form

May 5 to 24, 2019

The course is divided in two parts. The first two weeks of the course will be spent in Florence, capital of Tuscany and a UNESCO World Heritage site, where the group will examine the city of Renaissance and hone its urban landscape interpretative skills. For the third week, the group will travel to Rome where we will study the impact of Baroque urban planning on the current morphology of the city.

In Florence, the group will be staying at the heart of the city, in a small palazzo originally built for the powerful Medici family during the 15th century. Within walking distance, students will be able to explore famous museums and monuments such the Cathedral built in 1296, the Uffizi Gallery, the Palazzo Pitti, and the Ponte Vecchio.

In Rome, the group will be staying in the heart of the historical district, within walking distance of the Trevi fountain, the Colosseum and many more monuments of interest.

There are no strict course requirements to participate in this program. The professor will select applicants that are interested in geography, urban planning, architecture, and/or landscape interpretation. This program is open to second, third, or fourth year students from both campuses.

Program fees will be between $3,000 to $3,400*.

*The final program fee depends on the number of students in the program.

Note: The program fee will be offset by $1,000 for UBC students qualifying for the Go Global Award (e.g. those students with a 70% average from the best nine credits during the 2018-19 academic year). If you have any pass/fail courses, we will assess your average with advice from your faculty.

Included in program fees Not included in program fees
  • Accommodations
  • On-site group transportation
  • Some meals
  • Entrance fees
  • Guest lectures
  • Go Global fees
  • Some excursion costs
  • Flight
  • UBC tuition
  • Remainder of meals
  • Health or travel insurance
  • Immunizations (if necessary)
  • Visas (if necessary)
  • Personal spending money for communications, snacks, souvenirs, etc.

GEOG 491:

Selected Topics in Geography: Interpreting Urban Landscapes

An examination of the social, economic, cultural, and technological factors that have shaped European cities from early Roman times to the contemporary industrial city. Students will be provided with the tools necessary to observe, analyse, and interpret urban landscapes.

Rural and remote nursing practicum

This program is open to nursing students only.

Applications for this program are being accepted until Thursday, July 11, 2019 @ 11:59 PM. To apply, please complete the application form and submit it to goglobal.okanagan@ubc.ca.

Rural and Remote Nursing Application

This unique learning experience provides nursing students with the opportunity to apply several nursing concepts and skills in a rural and/or remote setting in Canada. Placements include, but are not limited to: Haida Gwaii, Oliver, Osoyoos, Enderby, other local rural communities in BC, and in Dawson City, Yukon.

This nursing practicum placement aims to provide students with an opportunity to apply and further their knowledge and skills in the areas of community engagement, health promotion, community identified Indigenous health priorities, cultural safety, and acute care/emergency services.

This program also aims to contribute positively to communities that are under-served and experiencing disproportionately high levels of health inequities. Students will have a faculty supervisor, but will be primarily working with a nurse within the community.

This rich immersion opportunity aims to help students better understand the complex health challenges that impact people with limited healthcare resources. Many students will be living in the communities in which they are learning. Students may have access to student housing, while others will be living in hotels or motels within the community.

Students are expected to be immersed in the community, and will be expected to give back to the communities in which they are placed. Students will also be expected to complete pre-practicum modules specific to rural nursing, the ethics of global health practicums, and cultural safety.

General information on two communities and the offered health services:

Dawson City, Yukon
A town located on the Yukon River approximately a six-hour drive north of Whitehorse (or one hour by plane). Its population is about 1,400, approximately 500 of whom identify as First Nation. Dawson is a popular tourist destination and its population rises to about 10,000 in the summer months.
Dawson has a six-bed community hospital and offers ambulatory care, emergency services, and diagnostics. Unstable patients are transferred to Whitehorse General Hospital via air ambulance.

Haida Gwaii, British Columbia
Formerly called the Queen Charlotte Islands, Haida Gwaii is a group of islands located approximately 60 kilometers off the Northern Pacific Coast of Canada. Approximately 4,500 people call Haida Gwaii home and, of that population, almost half of the islands’ population belong to the Haida Nation.

Healthcare services:

Haida Gwaii Hospital and Health Centre – Xaayda Gwaay Ngaaysdll Naay
The Haida Gwaii Hospital and Health Centre (also known as Xaayda Gwaay Ngaaysdll Naay) offers a team approach to care. Services provided include: general practice, low-risk obstetrics, emergency coverage including closed reductions, minor surgery, and stabilization of trauma and critically ill patients for transport when necessary. Health Centre services include a health clinic, public health, home support, diabetes and chronic disease support, infant development program, mental health and addictions, and the Haida Gwaii Cancer Care program. The hospital has eight acute care beds. The major medical centre transfer place is Prince George.

Queen Charlotte Medical Clinic
The in-hospital clinic offers a multi-disciplinary team of physicians, nurses, and allied health professionals. The clinic has family physicians and nurse practitioner support.

Sandspit Medical Clinic
This community clinic offers multi-disciplinary care involving nurses, physicians, mental health counsellors, physiotherapy, and home care services.

Xaaynang.nga Naay/Skidegate Health Centre
This community clinic offers services provided by a multi-disciplinary team including physicians, nurse practitioners, nurses, and allied health services. Programs include nurse practitioner and physician clinics, community health, maternal and child health, dietitian, mental health, and support with addictions.

The Northern Haida Gwaii Hospital and Health Centre
Located in Masset, the hospital services include: general medicine, laboratory, x-ray, community, public, and mental health services. The hospital is staffed 24/7.  The hospital has four acute care beds and four long-term care beds. There are limited emergency services, however the emergency department is open 24/7. The health care facility also offers prenatal care.

Early November to December, 2018

Early March to April, 2019

Students need to complete 240 hours over a maximum of an eight-week period.

Week one:

Students will be introduced to their ‘preceptor’ and orientated to the community and practice site. Students will be expected to contact their faculty supervisor to map out learning goals.

Week two to eight:

Students will have a shared experience of community practice and acute care practice. This will be organized between the student and the faculty supervisor.

Final week:

Students will be expected to present on their experience. This will also be arranged by the faculty supervisor and the preceptor.

Only Nursing students can apply. Students must be in fourth year and must have completed all of the cultural safety modules. Students must also take either the advanced community course (NRSG 428) or the advanced global health course (NRSG 429). Students must also have strong academic standing.

Program fees will be between $1,500 to 2,000*.

*The final fee is dependent on the rural placement.

Note: The program fee will be offset by $1,000 for UBC students qualifying for the Go Global Award (e.g. those students with a 70% average over 24 credits during the 2016-2017 academic year). If you have any pass/fail courses, we will assess your average with advice from your faculty.

NRSG 434 (4/8):

Practice electives

Preceptored advanced practice experience(s) provides opportunities for evidence-informed practice in varied contexts*. Application of knowledge, skills, and abilities from related advanced nursing theory course(s). Pass/Fail. *Dependent on availability

Prerequisite: All of NRSG 421, NRSG 422, NRSG 432. A minimum of three credits of nursing electives related to practicum context, and recommendation of practice advising committee (NRSG 438 or NRSG 439).

Landscapes as complex social-ecological systems: Kluane Lake, Yukon

This program is open to graduate and fourth-year students only.

Applications for this program are now closed.

This course will prepare students to critically assess and analyze the challenges and opportunities related to sustainably managing human interactions with the environment at the landscape scale, within in a diverse range of social, cultural, and economic contexts and in consideration of the inherent complexity of human-environment systems.

Using the Kluane Lake region, Yukon Territory as our study area, we will be exploring how historical and contemporary interactions between humans and the environment have shaped the present landscape. We will also explore how environmental and social drivers of change shape the landscape over scales of space and time, and discuss future resilience and vulnerability in this context. The field component of the course will cover present-day perspectives and visions of the landscape and use by different groups, as well as historical and contemporary natural resource management governance systems and approaches by First Nations, Parks Canada, and the territorial government.

This course will be relevant for graduate and upper-level undergraduate students studying environmental science, natural resource management, geography, or related fields.

Instructor: Lael Parrott, Professor in Sustainability, Departments of Earth, Environmental and Geographic Sciences and Biology, UBC Okanagan

Learning outcomes:

At the end of the term, students will be able to:

  • Describe how conceptual models of social-ecological systems are applicable at the regional landscape scale.
  • Understand how problems in environmental management or conservation can be resolved through a systems-level perspective that incorporates the knowledge and perspectives of different stakeholders.
  • Describe the key characteristics of a complex system and explain how these apply to a landscape with a special emphasis on thresholds, non-linearity, and feedback loops.
  • Propose how to integrate the inherent uncertainty of social-ecological systems into forecasting and prediction efforts.
  • Understand the concepts of resilience, panarchy, adaptive capacity and vulnerability as they apply to social-ecological systems, and in the specific context of landscapes.
  • For a given landscape context, propose policy, stewardship, management or other interventions that may contribute to achieving societal, economic and ecological objectives over the long-term.

Itinerary:

The course will involve preparatory readings and a field component. The field component will be held at the Kluane Research Station, Kluane Lake, YT and surrounding area. The station is situated next to the massive Elias Range and Kluane National Park. We will be exploring the region by vehicle and on foot (day hikes) and interacting with regional land managers and stakeholders. Snow is possible in September and students should be prepared for variable weather conditions.

Accommodations:

All meals and accommodation will be provided by the Kluane Lake Research Station. Detailed information about the station and accommodation can be found on the website and in the station manual (PDF).

Enrolment in a relevant graduate degree program or in the fourth year of a relevant undergraduate degree program. Only exceptional (first class standing) undergraduate students will be accepted. Limited spots are available for this program.

A good level of physical fitness is required to participate in day hikes or walks.

Program fees will be between $1,400 to $2,000*.

*The final fee is dependent on the number of students in the program.

Included in program fee Not included in program fee
  • Accommodations
  • In-Territory group transportation
  • Meals
  • Wifi
  • Guest lectures
  • Go Global fee
  • Flight
  • UBC tuition (three credits)
  • Health or travel insurance
  • Immunizations (if necessary)
  • Visas (if necessary)
  • Personal spending money for communications, snacks, souvenirs, etc.

EESC551D/418:

Complex social-ecological systems

Survey of recent knowledge and understanding related to the study and management of landscapes as complex, human-environment systems