Geographies of Migration and Settlement:
Europe, Africa, and Asia at a Crossroads
Lisbon, Azores Islands, Canary Islands

pontadel

Program dates 

May 4 - 29, 2019

About the program

This year's program will be run by Dr. Carlos Teixeira

The cross-border movement of populations is not a phenomenon unique to our contemporary world. However, in the last decades of the 20th century and in the first decade of the 21st century, goods, information, services, financial capital, and human beings have been moving across national borders at a level unprecedented in human history. Of these flows, population mobility remains the most regulated, complex, and controversial. International migration has traditionally been considered to be a combination of “push” factors from countries of origin – including economic desperation, political or religious persecution, and/or population pressure – and “pull” factors from destination countries – including economic opportunities and/or political or religious freedom (Castles, De Haas and Miller 2014). Historically, immigrants have tended to be seen as able-bodied, poorly educated, low-skill labourers migrating from less-developed countries in the hope of making a living in destination countries while sending money back to family in their home countries. While these stereotypical views of immigrants are still widely held in some quarters, the stereotype belies the reality of diversity among contemporary immigrant populations. At the same time, it must be noted that many developed countries (e.g., Western European countries like Spain and Portugal) experienced decreasing natural population growth in recent decades, making their immigration policies an integral part of their population and economic policies (Castles, De Haas and Miller 2014). In contrast, some African countries, including Morocco, continue to lose parts of their populations through “voluntary” and/or “involuntary” migration to Europe as well as to other parts of the world. These trends suggest that contemporary international migration has become much more complex than in earlier periods of history, and that “sending” and “receiving” countries of immigrants as well as immigrant profiles have been increasingly diversified (Castles, De Hass and Miller 2014). The present refugee crisis facing the world as a whole but the European Union — as a major “reception area” for refugees from different parts of the world, including the Middle East and Africa — in particular, makes Western Europe, including Spain and Portugal, excellent “social laboratories” to study geographies of migration and settlement.

This course provides a broad introduction to the multiple aspects of international population movements in the modern world. Particular attention is paid to the analysis of international regimes regulating migration, “voluntary” and “involuntary/forced” migration; changes in global demographics, immigration policies of nation states, international migration patterns, settlement policies and the imprint of (legal and illegal) immigration in European and African cities and the future of migration in Europe (reception areas of migration) and the Middle East and Africa (sending regions/countries of immigrants and refugees). Case studies of specific immigration policies and settlement services to immigrants and refugees will be drawn mainly from the experience of Western European countries. 

laspalmas

General timeline

Learning from diverse voices – ranging from community leaders, local farmers, village elders, storytellers, artists, to innovators of cultural production in East Africa – we will visit culturally and ecologically unique communities and places.  From a nearby Maasai villages to wildlife parks, grassroots community initiatives to works and performances by writers and leading-edge film makers, students will have opportunities to engage with interdisciplinary and intercultural perspectives that go beyond conventional borders. 

 
Week 1: Autonomous Region of Azores, Portugal 

(Island of Sao Miguel, City of Ponta Delgada) (May 4 - 11)

Visits to museums (e.g., Azorean Immigration Museum) and local neighbourhoods/districts. Also we will attend meetings/workshops at government (e.g., Regional Department for Azorean Communities abroad [D.R.C.] and NGOs (e.g., AIPA and ARRISCA) as well as at the local university (University of Azores) dealing with migration and population issues, including immigration policies and settlement services to immigrants and deportees (Azoreans who left the islands for USA and Canada at a young age and then were deported to the islands).

granc


Week 2: Canary Islands, Spain
(Island of Gran Canaria, City of Las Palmas ) (May 11 – 18)

Visit to the historical town, museums and local neighbourhoods/districts. Also we will attend meetings/workshops at government and NGOs as well as at a local university (Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria) dealing with migration and population issues in the Canary islands/Spain as well as in Africa.

 

lisbon

Week 3: City of Lisbon (Portugal) (May 18 – 29)

Visits to historical towns (e.g., Historic Centre of Evora and/or the Cultural Landscape of Sintra - UNESCO – World Heritage Sites), museums and local neighbourhoods/districts. Also we will attend meetings/workshops at government and NGOs as well as at local universities (University of Lisbon [IGOT/Geography Department and CES/Centre for Social Studies] and Open University [Department of Migration Studies]) dealing with migration and population issues, including immigration policies and settlement services to immigrants and refugees in Europe.

Coursework 

GEOG 353 (3 credits) - Geographies of Migration and Settlement: Europe, Africa, and Asia at a Crossroads

pdelp

Eligibility and prerequisite

An interest in Geography is important, but previous study is not required.

Program fees

Program fees – $3,400 - $3,600* 

NOTE: The program fee will be offset by $1,000 for UBC students qualifying for the Go Global Award (i.e., those students with a 70% average from the best 9 credits during term 1 of the 2018-19 academic year). If you have any pass/fail courses, we will assess your average with advice from your faculty.

*The final program fee depends on the number of students in the program

INCLUDED in program fee

NOT included in program fee

  • Go Global Award is given to students who have 70% in their best 9 credits from Term 1 of the 2018-19 year
  • Accommodations
  • On-site group transportation
  • Some meals
  • Entrance fees
  • Guest lectures
  • Go Global Fee
  • Flight
  • UBC tuition
  • Remainder of meals
  • Health or travel insurance
  • Immunizations (if necessary)
  • Visas (if necessary)
  • Personal spending money for communications, snacks, souvenirs, etc.


saomiguel

Application deadline

Applications for this program are now closed.

 

Last reviewed shim11/26/2018 8:56:47 AM